The Fallacies of Anti-Hadith Arguments

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐅𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐧𝐭𝐢-𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐀𝐫𝐠𝐮𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐬



Mohamad Mostafa Nassar

Twitter:@NassarMohamadMR

𝐀𝐧𝐬𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐒𝐡𝐚𝐲𝐤𝐡 𝐒𝐡𝐚𝐡𝐢𝐝𝐮𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐅𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐝𝐢

𝐐𝐮𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧:

𝐖𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐚 𝐭𝐲𝐩𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐜𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐬𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐲 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐚𝐧𝐛𝐚𝐥𝐢 𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐛? 𝐖𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐛𝐨𝐨𝐤𝐬 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐈 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐝?

𝐀𝐧𝐬𝐰𝐞𝐫:

In the Name of Allah, Most Gracious, Most Merciful

𝐓𝐚𝐤𝐞𝐧 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦

𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐒𝐮𝐧𝐧𝐚𝐡 – 𝐈𝐝𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐑𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐞𝐬
𝟏𝟒 𝐒𝐞𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐄𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐲𝐬, 𝐞𝐝𝐭𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐏.𝐊 𝐊𝐨𝐲𝐚
𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐜 𝐁𝐨𝐨𝐤 𝐓𝐫𝐮𝐬𝐭, 𝐌𝐚𝐥𝐚𝐲𝐬𝐢𝐚 𝐢𝐬𝐛𝐧 𝟗𝟖𝟑-𝟗𝟏𝟓𝟒-𝟎𝟐-𝟖

𝟕 𝐓𝐇𝐄 𝐅𝐀𝐋𝐋𝐀𝐂𝐈𝐄𝐒 𝐎𝐅 𝐀𝐍𝐓𝐈-𝐇𝐀𝐃𝐈𝐓𝐇 𝐀𝐑𝐆𝐔𝐌𝐄𝐍𝐓𝐒

𝐒𝐇𝐀𝐇 𝐒𝐇𝐀𝐇𝐈𝐃𝐔𝐋𝐋𝐀𝐇 𝐅𝐀𝐑𝐈𝐃𝐈

𝐈𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐨𝐧 𝐩𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐦𝐨𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐧 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞𝐬 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐰𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐧 𝐞𝐝𝐮𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐩𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐜 𝐜𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐜𝐥𝐚𝐢𝐦 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐫𝐞𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐭 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦 𝐛𝐲 𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐨𝐥𝐲 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲, 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐫𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐒𝐮𝐧𝐧𝐚𝐡 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐨𝐥𝐲 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐭𝐞𝐱𝐭 𝐨𝐫 𝐚𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫. 𝐔𝐧𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐥𝐲 𝐨𝐫 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐥𝐲 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐦𝐞𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐤𝐞 𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐲 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦 𝐨𝐧 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐢𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐟𝐢𝐫𝐦𝐥𝐲 𝐛𝐚𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐚𝐬𝐭 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐭𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐜𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐬.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐢𝐦 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐦𝐩𝐭𝐬 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐫𝐞𝐝𝐮𝐜𝐞 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦 𝐭𝐨 𝐚 𝐬𝐞𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐠𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐩𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐢𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐬, 𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐩𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐨𝐫 𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐝 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐬𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐰𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐧 𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐞, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐨 𝐞𝐧𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐭𝐨 𝐥𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐚 𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐞 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐧 𝐰𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐧 𝐄𝐮𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐥𝐞 𝐟𝐢𝐱𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐚𝐛𝐞𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦 𝐭𝐨 𝐢𝐭.

𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐩𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐞 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐬𝐨 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐨𝐧 𝐢𝐧 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐯𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐒𝐮𝐧𝐧𝐚𝐡 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐛𝐞 𝐦𝐚𝐝𝐞 𝐜𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐫 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬, 𝐰𝐡𝐨, 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐥𝐚𝐜𝐤 𝐨𝐟 𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰𝐥𝐞𝐝𝐠𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐜𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦 𝐦𝐚𝐲 𝐛𝐞 𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐦𝐢𝐬𝐠𝐮𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐝 𝐰𝐚𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐬𝐨-𝐜𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐝 “𝐦𝐨𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐧” 𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐚𝐬 𝐰𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐚𝐥𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐲 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐚𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐞𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐩𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐞, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐜𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐥𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦.

𝐈𝐭 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐛𝐞 𝐰𝐞𝐥𝐥 𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐭𝐨𝐨𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐨𝐧𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐞𝐰𝐟𝐚𝐧𝐠𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐨𝐫𝐲 (𝐧𝐞𝐰-𝐟𝐚𝐧𝐠𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐠𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐮𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦, 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡 𝐢𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐨𝐧 𝐯𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐨𝐜𝐜𝐚𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐜 𝐡𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐲) 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐯𝐞𝐬 𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐲 𝐝𝐞𝐯𝐨𝐢𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰𝐥𝐞𝐝𝐠𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐪𝐮𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐨𝐩𝐢𝐧𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐬𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐢𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐬𝐨𝐥𝐢𝐝 𝐠𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐀𝐫𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐜 𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐠𝐮𝐚𝐠𝐞, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐨𝐨𝐤𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐬𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐜𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟.

𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐜 𝐋𝐚𝐰 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐬𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐢𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐥, 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐜 𝐡𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐲 𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐫𝐝 𝐨𝐫 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐭𝐡 𝐡𝐚𝐧𝐝. 𝐇𝐨𝐰 𝐚𝐧𝐲𝐨𝐧𝐞, 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐡𝐨𝐩𝐞𝐥𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐥𝐲 𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐝𝐞𝐪𝐮𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐟𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐩𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐚 𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐩 𝐬𝐮𝐛𝐣𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐚𝐬 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦, 𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐠𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐨𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐧 𝐞𝐫𝐚. 𝐈𝐧 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬, 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐞𝐧𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞𝐬 𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐦𝐢𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐬 𝐚 𝐦𝐢𝐬𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐢𝐠𝐧𝐨𝐫𝐚𝐦𝐮𝐬 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐨𝐝𝐚𝐲 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬𝐢𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐬𝐮𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐟𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐩𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐦𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐛𝐞𝐫𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐭.

𝐇𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐲 𝐢𝐬 𝐛𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐜𝐭𝐞𝐝, 𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐢𝐜 𝐢𝐬 𝐟𝐥𝐨𝐮𝐭𝐞𝐝, 𝐚𝐬 𝐢𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐭𝐰𝐨 𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐥𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐡𝐮𝐦𝐚𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐧𝐨 𝐯𝐚𝐥𝐮𝐞. 𝐈𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐝, 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐧𝐨 𝐯𝐚𝐥𝐮𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐰𝐢𝐬𝐡 𝐭𝐨 𝐩𝐮𝐭 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐝 𝐩𝐮𝐫𝐞 𝐟𝐢𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐢𝐦𝐚𝐠𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐭𝐡, 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐡𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐢𝐜 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐬𝐭 𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐦𝐢𝐞𝐬.

𝐖𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐰 𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐒𝐮𝐧𝐧𝐚𝐡 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐧 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐠𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦 𝐢𝐧 𝐚𝐝𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧. 𝐍𝐨 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐫 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐲, 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦, 𝐛𝐞𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐝𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐆𝐨𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐦𝐚𝐧. 𝐀𝐥𝐥 𝐩𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐢𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐮𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲, 𝐩𝐫𝐢𝐯𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐨𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐮𝐥𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐥𝐲 𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐝 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐨𝐥𝐲 𝐁𝐨𝐨𝐤. 𝐁𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐨𝐥𝐲 𝐁𝐨𝐨𝐤 𝐢𝐭𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐟 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐢𝐧 𝐟𝐚𝐜𝐭, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐠𝐮𝐚𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐨𝐥𝐲 𝐁𝐨𝐨𝐤.

𝐈𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐫𝐲, 𝐢𝐧 𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐚 𝐦𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐫 𝐨𝐟 𝐆𝐨𝐝, 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐟𝐫𝐞𝐞 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐛𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐞𝐫𝐫𝐨𝐫 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐝𝐞𝐯𝐢𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐛𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐞𝐫𝐫𝐨𝐫 𝐰𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐚𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐨𝐥𝐲 𝐁𝐨𝐨𝐤. 𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐟𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐨𝐟 𝐚 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐰𝐨 𝐟𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐚𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐥𝐬 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲, 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐟 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐃𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐭𝐡 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐨𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐌𝐮𝐡𝐚𝐦𝐦𝐚𝐝. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐭𝐡 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐟𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐬 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐭𝐰𝐨 𝐛𝐚𝐬𝐢𝐜 𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐭𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐬, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐨 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐬𝐞𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐥𝐲.

𝐁𝐮𝐭 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐡𝐚𝐩𝐬 𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐝𝐚𝐲 “𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐞𝐫𝐬” 𝐝𝐨 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐚𝐜𝐜𝐞𝐩𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 “𝐆𝐨𝐨𝐝 𝐖𝐨𝐫𝐝” (𝐊𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐚𝐡 𝐓𝐚𝐲𝐲𝐢𝐛𝐚𝐡) 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐠𝐢𝐧𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐚𝐫𝐤 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐮𝐢𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐮𝐧𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫, 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧. 𝐓𝐨 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐝𝐞𝐩𝐭𝐡𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐚𝐛𝐬𝐮𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐢𝐬𝐮𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐢𝐜 𝐨𝐟 𝐦𝐚𝐧 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐤!

𝐀 𝐦𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐫 𝐨𝐟 𝐆𝐨𝐝, 𝐛𝐞𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐧𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐥𝐲 𝐟𝐫𝐞𝐞 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐞𝐫𝐫𝐨𝐫, 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐮𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐠𝐮𝐢𝐝𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐆𝐨𝐝.

𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐠𝐮𝐢𝐝𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐝𝐞𝐬𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐛𝐞𝐝 𝐦𝐨𝐬𝐭 𝐦𝐞𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐟𝐮𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐛𝐲 𝐆𝐨𝐝 𝐇𝐢𝐦𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐟 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧:

𝐓𝐡𝐨𝐮 𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐧𝐯𝐨𝐲𝐬, 𝐨𝐧 𝐚 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐡 (𝟑𝟔:𝟑-𝟒).

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐜𝐚𝐧𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐭𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐩 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐭 𝐰𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐛𝐞 𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐡; 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐡𝐢𝐦 𝐭𝐨 𝐝𝐞𝐯𝐢𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐡 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐚𝐧 𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐡 𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐨 𝐚 𝐜𝐫𝐨𝐨𝐤𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐧𝐞. 𝐆𝐨𝐝 𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐞𝐥𝐮𝐜𝐢𝐝𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐞𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐡 𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐨𝐜𝐜𝐚𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧:

𝐈𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐝, 𝐦𝐲 𝐥𝐨𝐫𝐝 𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐧 𝐚 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐡 (𝟏𝟏:𝟓𝟔).

𝐈𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐨 𝐆𝐨𝐝, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐡 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐠𝐮𝐢𝐝𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐮𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐆𝐨𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐪𝐮𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐦𝐢𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐡. 𝐍𝐨𝐭 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬, 𝐆𝐨𝐝 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐢𝐦𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭:

𝐇𝐞 𝐠𝐮𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐨𝐦 𝐇𝐞 𝐰𝐢𝐥𝐥𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐚 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐡 (𝟐:𝟏𝟒𝟐).

𝐀𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐚𝐠𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐮𝐫𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭:

𝐓𝐡𝐨𝐮 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐝 𝐠𝐮𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐬𝐭 (𝐦𝐞𝐧) 𝐭𝐨 𝐚 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐡 (𝟒𝟐:𝟓𝟐),

𝐢.𝐞., 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐡𝐢𝐦𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐟 𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐒𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐏𝐚𝐭𝐡, 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐠𝐮𝐢𝐝𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐭𝐨𝐨 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐟𝐢𝐫𝐦𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐆𝐨𝐝 𝐚𝐬 𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐡, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐠𝐮𝐢𝐝𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐢𝐬, 𝐚𝐬 𝐢𝐭 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞, 𝐆𝐨𝐝’𝐬 𝐠𝐮𝐢𝐝𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭, 𝐥𝐢𝐤𝐞 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬, 𝐮𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐩𝐫𝐚𝐲 “𝐆𝐮𝐢𝐝𝐞 𝐮𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐡”, 𝐚𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐒𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐡 𝐚𝐥-𝐅𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐡𝐚𝐡, 𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐮𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐠𝐮𝐢𝐝𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐝 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐡𝐢𝐦𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐟 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐆𝐨𝐝, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐬 𝐚 𝐬𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐚𝐧𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐆𝐨𝐝 𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐮𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐢𝐧 𝐧𝐞𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐢𝐭, 𝐛𝐮𝐭
𝐆𝐨𝐝 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐜𝐚𝐬𝐞 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐠𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐩𝐫𝐚𝐲𝐞𝐫 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐢𝐭𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐟:

𝐓𝐡𝐨𝐮 𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐧𝐯𝐨𝐲𝐬, 𝐨𝐧 𝐚 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐡 (𝟑𝟔:𝟑-𝟒).

𝐈𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐢𝐬𝐡𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐆𝐨𝐝’𝐬 𝐖𝐨𝐫𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐠𝐮𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐝 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐛𝐬𝐨𝐥𝐮𝐭𝐞𝐥𝐲 𝐛𝐲 𝐆𝐨𝐝, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐠𝐮𝐢𝐝𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐦𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐲 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐟𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐦𝐢𝐭𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧. 𝐆𝐨𝐝’𝐬 𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐫𝐝 𝐢𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐯𝐢𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐫 𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬. 𝐁𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 “𝐦𝐨𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐧𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬” 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐜𝐥𝐚𝐢𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐠𝐮𝐢𝐝𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐠𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐟𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧, 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐟𝐮𝐧𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐬 𝐚 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐟𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐝𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧, 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐜𝐚𝐫𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐧 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐚𝐩𝐚𝐜𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐝𝐞𝐫 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐲, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐞𝐪𝐮𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐧𝐨 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐬𝐢𝐠𝐧𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞.

𝐁𝐮𝐭 𝐆𝐨𝐝 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐠𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐮𝐬 𝐚 𝐛𝐨𝐨𝐤 “𝐢𝐧 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐨 𝐝𝐨𝐮𝐛𝐭” 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭’𝐬 𝐟𝐮𝐧𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐞𝐧𝐮𝐦𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐝𝐞𝐭𝐚𝐢𝐥:

𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐝 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐠𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐚 𝐦𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐫 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐚𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐯𝐞𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐭𝐞𝐭𝐡 𝐮𝐧𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐇𝐢𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐩𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐞𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐡𝐞𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐁𝐨𝐨𝐤 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐖𝐢𝐬𝐝𝐨𝐦 (𝟑:𝟏𝟔𝟒).

𝐇𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐆𝐨𝐝 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐨𝐥𝐝 𝐮𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐟𝐮𝐧𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭, 𝐨𝐟 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐢𝐫𝐬𝐭 𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧, “𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐇𝐢𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬”; 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐞𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐬𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬, 𝐨𝐟 “𝐩𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐟𝐲𝐢𝐧𝐠”, “𝐭𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐁𝐨𝐨𝐤” 𝐚𝐧𝐝 “𝐭𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐖𝐢𝐬𝐝𝐨𝐦”. 𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐟𝐮𝐧𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐝𝐞𝐬𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐛𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐮𝐫𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐆𝐨𝐝 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐫, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐆𝐨𝐝’𝐬 𝐠𝐮𝐢𝐝𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐦𝐚𝐧 𝐰𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐛𝐞 𝐟𝐮𝐥𝐟𝐢𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐛𝐲 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲.


𝐀𝐥𝐥 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐟𝐮𝐧𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐆𝐨𝐝’𝐬 𝐠𝐮𝐢𝐝𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐮𝐫𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐫 𝐢𝐬, 𝐚𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 “𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐇𝐢𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬, ” 𝐟𝐢𝐫𝐬𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐨 “𝐩𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐟𝐲” 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦, 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐞𝐫 𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐁𝐨𝐨𝐤 𝐚𝐧𝐝 “𝐰𝐢𝐬𝐝𝐨𝐦,” 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐩𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐨 𝐩𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐞, 𝐢𝐬 𝐮𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐮𝐧𝐥𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐚 𝐩𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬, 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐚𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐝. 𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐩𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐮𝐚𝐥 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐥𝐮𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐨𝐥𝐲 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭’𝐬 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐮𝐚𝐥 𝐞𝐱𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐛𝐲 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐞𝐱𝐚𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐩𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐟𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐭𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐝𝐬.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐧𝐞𝐱𝐭 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝐚𝐟𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐩𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 “𝐭𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐁𝐨𝐨𝐤,” 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐬, 𝐭𝐨 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐝𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐁𝐨𝐨𝐤, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐥𝐲 𝐢𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐢𝐫𝐜𝐮𝐦𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐡𝐮𝐦𝐚𝐧 𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐨𝐬𝐭 𝐞𝐱𝐜𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐲. 𝐅𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 “𝐭𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐟 𝐰𝐢𝐬𝐝𝐨𝐦” 𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐝𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐥𝐨𝐩𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐨 𝐚 𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐜𝐞𝐫𝐭𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐬𝐮𝐛𝐣𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐬 𝐭𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐠𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧, 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐚𝐬 𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐮𝐚𝐥 𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞, 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐒𝐡𝐚𝐫𝐢’𝐚𝐡, 𝐨𝐟 𝐠𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐧𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐞𝐭𝐜., 𝐫𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐰𝐞 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐟𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝐯𝐚𝐥𝐮𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐠𝐮𝐢𝐝𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐛𝐨𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐨𝐫𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐩𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭.

𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐦𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐟𝐮𝐧𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐭𝐮𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐜𝐚𝐫𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐠𝐮𝐢𝐝𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐆𝐨𝐝 𝐇𝐢𝐦𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐟, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐭𝐮𝐭𝐞 𝐚𝐧 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐠𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐆𝐨𝐝’𝐬 𝐦𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐝. 𝐓𝐨 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐢𝐫𝐬𝐭 𝐟𝐮𝐧𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐬𝐢𝐠𝐧𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐢𝐬 𝐬𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐟𝐥𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐖𝐨𝐫𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐆𝐨𝐝.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 “𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐝𝐨𝐮𝐛𝐭” 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐚 𝐂𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐫 𝐁𝐨𝐨𝐤 (𝐊𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐛 𝐚𝐥-𝐌𝐮𝐛𝐢𝐧) 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐚𝐬𝐢𝐜 𝐩𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐢𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐜 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐆𝐨𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐨𝐬𝐭 𝐮𝐧𝐦𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐤𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐦𝐬. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐮𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐒𝐮𝐧𝐧𝐚𝐡 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐝𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐫𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞:

𝐘𝐨𝐮 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐫 𝐨𝐟 𝐆𝐨𝐝 𝐚𝐬 𝐠𝐨𝐨𝐝 𝐞𝐱𝐚𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐡𝐢𝐦 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐥𝐨𝐨𝐤𝐬 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐆𝐨𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐋𝐚𝐬𝐭 𝐃𝐚𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐫𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐦𝐛𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐆𝐨𝐝 𝐦𝐮𝐜𝐡 (𝟑𝟑:𝟐𝟏)

𝐁𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐮𝐬𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧 “𝐚 𝐠𝐨𝐨𝐝 𝐞𝐱𝐚𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞” (𝐔𝐬𝐰𝐚𝐭𝐮𝐧 𝐇𝐚𝐬𝐚𝐧𝐚𝐡), 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐠𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐒𝐮𝐧𝐧𝐚𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐚 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐯𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐥 𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐟𝐮𝐫𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐪𝐮𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐰𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐜𝐜𝐞𝐩𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐥𝐨𝐨𝐤 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐦𝐞𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐆𝐨𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐋𝐚𝐬𝐭 𝐃𝐚𝐲, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐬 𝐚 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐮𝐥𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐰𝐚𝐲𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐦𝐛𝐞𝐫 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡.

𝐅𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭’𝐬 𝐞𝐱𝐚𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐦𝐚𝐝𝐞 𝐚 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐭𝐡, 𝐚𝐧 𝐚𝐜𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐢𝐧 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐋𝐚𝐬𝐭 𝐃𝐚𝐲, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐲𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐝𝐨𝐞𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐚𝐜𝐜𝐞𝐩𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐟𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐞𝐱𝐚𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐜𝐚𝐧𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐜𝐥𝐚𝐢𝐦, 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐖𝐨𝐫𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐆𝐨𝐝 𝐢𝐭𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐟, 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐭𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐭𝐡. 𝐇𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐝 “𝐞𝐱𝐚𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞” 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐮𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐛𝐬𝐨𝐥𝐮𝐭𝐞𝐥𝐲, 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐢𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐫 𝐚𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭’𝐬 𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐞, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐨 𝐜𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐬, 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐝𝐬, 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐦𝐢𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐡𝐢𝐛𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬, 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐩𝐫𝐢𝐯𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐩𝐮𝐛𝐥𝐢𝐜 𝐛𝐞𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐫, 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐩 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐝𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐪𝐮𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐬.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭’𝐬 𝐒𝐮𝐧𝐧𝐚𝐡 𝐢𝐬 𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐛𝐲 𝐞𝐥𝐞𝐯𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐚 𝐝𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐧𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐭𝐮𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐢𝐧 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐬𝐚𝐲𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬 𝐚 𝐝𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐮𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐆𝐨𝐝’𝐬 𝐦𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐠𝐞. 𝐈𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐜𝐮𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐲, 𝐆𝐨𝐝 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐡𝐚𝐭𝐡 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐝 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐠𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐚 𝐦𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐫 𝐚𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐯𝐞𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐭𝐞𝐭𝐡 𝐮𝐧𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐁𝐨𝐨𝐤 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐢𝐬𝐝𝐨𝐦.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐠𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐞 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐅𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐌𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐭𝐨 𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐚𝐧 𝐚𝐮𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐁𝐨𝐨𝐤 𝐢𝐧 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐢𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐩𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐥𝐚𝐢𝐝 𝐝𝐨𝐰𝐧, 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐢𝐧 𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐨 𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 “𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐡” 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐜𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐮𝐢𝐬𝐡𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐢𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐯𝐞𝐥, 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐚 𝐥𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐞𝐱𝐚𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐰 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐟𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐢𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐡𝐮𝐦𝐚𝐧 𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐞; 𝐢𝐧 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐬, 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐠𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐮𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐠𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐛𝐨𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐢𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐥𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐛𝐚𝐥 𝐦𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐠𝐞, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐮𝐦𝐚𝐧 𝐦𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐠𝐞 – 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐣𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐛𝐚𝐥 𝐦𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐡𝐮𝐦𝐚𝐧 𝐛𝐞𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐫. 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐥𝐨𝐨𝐤 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐦𝐞𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐇𝐢𝐦 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐋𝐚𝐬𝐭 𝐃𝐚𝐲, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐫𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐦𝐛𝐞𝐫 𝐇𝐢𝐦 𝐦𝐮𝐜𝐡, 𝐰𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐜𝐞𝐫𝐭𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐜𝐜𝐞𝐩𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐡𝐮𝐦𝐚𝐧 𝐦𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐠𝐞, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐫𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐦𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐟𝐢𝐫𝐦𝐥𝐲 𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐢𝐬𝐡𝐞𝐝, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐰𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐛𝐞 𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐟𝐢𝐭 𝐛𝐲 𝐢𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐟𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐯𝐞𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐢𝐭.

𝐓𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐧𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐚𝐥𝐰𝐚𝐲𝐬 𝐭𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐒𝐮𝐧𝐧𝐚𝐡 𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐧 𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐥𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐦𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐨𝐩𝐢𝐧𝐢𝐨𝐧; 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐛𝐞𝐲𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐫 𝐢𝐧𝐣𝐮𝐧𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐮𝐭𝐦𝐨𝐬𝐭 𝐜𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐭𝐨𝐨𝐤 𝐭𝐨 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭’𝐬 𝐩𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐚𝐲𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐦𝐢𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐜𝐚𝐦𝐞 𝐚𝐟𝐭𝐞𝐫.

𝐖𝐞 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐬𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐝𝐞𝐟𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐮𝐧𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐞𝐭 𝐮𝐩 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐢𝐧 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐚𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐬 𝐚𝐬 𝐚 𝐦𝐨𝐝𝐞𝐥 𝐨𝐧 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐥𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐬. 𝐈𝐭 𝐫𝐞𝐦𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐜𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐞𝐱𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐞𝐱𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐛𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐟𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐧; 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐫 𝐞𝐦𝐩𝐡𝐚𝐬𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐝𝐮𝐭𝐲 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐥𝐚𝐢𝐝 𝐮𝐩𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐩𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐪𝐮𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐦𝐦𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐥𝐲 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐡𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐠:

𝐎𝐛𝐞𝐲 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐨𝐛𝐞𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 (𝟓:𝟗𝟐),

𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐰𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐨𝐥𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐣𝐮𝐬𝐭 𝐚𝐬 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡’𝐬 𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐡𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐨𝐛𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞, 𝐬𝐨 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐥𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡’𝐬 𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐞𝐪𝐮𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐛𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐲.

𝐈𝐧 𝐟𝐚𝐜𝐭, 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡’𝐬 𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐛𝐚𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐨𝐧𝐞, 𝐟𝐨𝐫:

𝐖𝐡𝐨𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐨𝐛𝐞𝐲𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭, 𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐨𝐛𝐞𝐲𝐞𝐝 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 (𝟒:𝟖𝟎).

𝐈𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡’𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐢𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐞 𝐰𝐢𝐬𝐝𝐨𝐦 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐭𝐨𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐬 𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐩𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐢𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐜𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧, 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐥𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐥𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐢𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐬 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐥𝐞𝐟𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭, 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭’𝐬 𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐮𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐟𝐢𝐫𝐦𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡, 𝐬𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐨𝐛𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭’𝐬 𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐞𝐫 𝐢𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐨𝐛𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡.

𝐈𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐞𝐱𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐒𝐮𝐧𝐧𝐚𝐡 𝐢𝐧 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦’𝐬 𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐢𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐞 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐛𝐞 𝐭𝐨𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐬 𝐢𝐭, 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐞 𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡, 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐬 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐟𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐠𝐮𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐭 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐲 𝐦𝐨𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐛𝐲 𝐝𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐧𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧. 𝐈𝐭 𝐰𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐛𝐞 𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐰𝐢𝐬𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐭𝐨 𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐝 𝐡𝐢𝐦 𝐮𝐩 𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐧 𝐮𝐧𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐞𝐱𝐚𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐝, 𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐨 𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐞𝐫 𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐭 𝐨𝐛𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐡𝐢𝐦.

𝐁𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐥𝐲 𝐢𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 “𝐦𝐨𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐧𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬” 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐢𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐟𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭’𝐬 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐝𝐬, 𝐚𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐦𝐢𝐭𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐝, 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐛𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐧 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐜𝐞𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐠𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬. 𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐝, 𝐚𝐬 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐝𝐲 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐰𝐧, 𝐢𝐬 𝐪𝐮𝐢𝐭𝐞 𝐮𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡’𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐝𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐫𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭, 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐮𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐭 𝐪𝐮𝐢𝐭𝐞 𝐜𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 (𝐰𝐚𝐡𝐲) 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐟𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐁𝐨𝐨𝐤𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡, 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐚 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐮𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐜𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭𝐬. 𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐧𝐮𝐦𝐞𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐬 𝐚 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐜𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐪𝐮𝐢𝐭𝐞 𝐚𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐁𝐨𝐨𝐤𝐬.

𝐅𝐨𝐫 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞, 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐬𝐚𝐢𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐀𝐝𝐚𝐦:

𝐎 𝐀𝐝𝐚𝐦, 𝐝𝐰𝐞𝐥𝐥 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐲 𝐰𝐢𝐟𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐆𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐞𝐧 (𝟐:𝟑𝟓),

𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐋𝐨𝐫𝐝 𝐜𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦:

𝐃𝐢𝐝 𝐈 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐛𝐢𝐝 𝐲𝐨𝐮 . . . (𝟕:𝟐𝟐).

𝐈𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐚𝐬𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐍𝐨𝐚𝐡:

𝐀𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐍𝐨𝐚𝐡: 𝐍𝐨 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐲 𝐟𝐨𝐥𝐤 𝐰𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞 𝐬𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐡𝐢𝐦 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐡𝐚𝐭𝐡 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐥𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐝𝐲 (𝟏𝟏:𝟑𝟔); 𝐋𝐨𝐚𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐰𝐨 𝐨𝐟 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐲 𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐝 (𝟏𝟏:𝟏𝟏); 𝐎 𝐍𝐨𝐚𝐡, 𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐲 𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐬𝐞𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐝 (𝟏𝟏:𝟒𝟔).

𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐡𝐚𝐦:

𝐓𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐚𝐫𝐠𝐮𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭, 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐰𝐞 𝐠𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐀𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐡𝐚𝐦 𝐚𝐠𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐟𝐨𝐥𝐤 (𝟔:𝟖𝟑); 𝐎 𝐀𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐡𝐚𝐦, 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐬𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 (𝟏𝟏:𝟐𝟔);

𝐉𝐚𝐜𝐨𝐛 𝐬𝐚𝐢𝐝:

𝐈 𝐝𝐨 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐝 𝐬𝐜𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐉𝐨𝐬𝐞𝐩𝐡, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐝 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐞𝐲𝐞𝐬𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭, 𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐚𝐢𝐝:

𝐃𝐢𝐝 𝐈 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐬𝐚𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐈 𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰 𝐧𝐨𝐭? (𝟏𝟐:𝟗𝟒 𝐟𝐟.).

𝐈𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐚𝐬𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐉𝐨𝐬𝐞𝐩𝐡:

𝐖𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐡𝐢𝐦: 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮 𝐰𝐢𝐥𝐭 𝐭𝐞𝐥𝐥 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰 𝐧𝐨𝐭 (𝟏𝟐:𝟏𝟓).

𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐜𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐌𝐨𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐓𝐮𝐰𝐚:

𝐎 𝐌𝐨𝐬𝐞𝐬, 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐥𝐲 𝐈 𝐚𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐲 𝐋𝐨𝐫𝐝 (𝟐𝟎:𝟏𝟐),

𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐧:

. . . 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐤𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐝.

𝐀𝐠𝐚𝐢𝐧:

𝐖𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐌𝐨𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐬𝐚𝐲𝐢𝐧𝐠: 𝐓𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐚𝐰𝐚𝐲 𝐦𝐲 𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐯𝐞𝐬 𝐛𝐲 𝐧𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 (𝟐𝟎:𝟕𝟕).

𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐛𝐞 𝐠𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐧, 𝐢𝐧 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐢𝐬 𝐦𝐚𝐝𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐧 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐨 𝐝𝐨 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐁𝐨𝐨𝐤𝐬.

𝐖𝐞 𝐜𝐚𝐧𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐭𝐨𝐨 𝐦𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐨𝐢𝐧𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐧 𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐚 “𝐠𝐨𝐨𝐝 𝐞𝐱𝐚𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞” 𝐭𝐨 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬, 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐫𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐛𝐞 𝐚𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞𝐬 𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡. 𝐌𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐧𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐟 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐮𝐚𝐥 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬, 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫 𝐇𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐮𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐜𝐞𝐬, 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐝𝐞𝐭𝐚𝐢𝐥𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐥𝐝𝐥𝐲 𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐞 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐢𝐭 𝐰𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐛𝐞 𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐚𝐧 𝐞𝐱𝐚𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐨𝐨 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐚𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞𝐬.

𝐍𝐨 𝐦𝐚𝐧 𝐛𝐲 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐞𝐟𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐫 𝐛𝐲 𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐭 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐪𝐮𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐨𝐧𝐢𝐟𝐲 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦. 𝐈𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐨 𝐚𝐫𝐠𝐮𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐨𝐜𝐜𝐚𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐚𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐨𝐩𝐢𝐧𝐢𝐨𝐧. 𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐨𝐜𝐜𝐚𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐫𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐝𝐢𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐢𝐧𝐯𝐨𝐥𝐯𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐨𝐫 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐪𝐮𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐚𝐬 𝐦𝐞𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐝𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐜𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐨𝐩𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐛𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐥𝐞.

𝐀𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐨𝐜𝐜𝐚𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐝𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚 𝐜𝐚𝐬𝐞 𝐚𝐟𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐛𝐨𝐭𝐡 𝐬𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐬, 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭’𝐬 𝐞𝐱𝐚𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞, 𝐚𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡, 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐜𝐚𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐛𝐞 𝐝𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐨𝐮𝐭𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐝 𝐞𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐲𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐟𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐞𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐚 𝐰𝐚𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐝𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐨𝐮𝐭𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐭, 𝐦𝐚𝐲 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐚𝐬𝐞 𝐝𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐟𝐚𝐯𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐩𝐚𝐲 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐝𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐢𝐭 𝐛𝐞𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐥𝐲 𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐝𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐝𝐞 𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐥𝐝𝐥𝐲 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐲 𝐚𝐟𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐮𝐥𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐟𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐬:

𝐂𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐮𝐥𝐭 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐮𝐩𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐝𝐮𝐜𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐚𝐟𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐫𝐬 (𝟑:𝟏𝟓𝟗).

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐱𝐞𝐫𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐡𝐮𝐦𝐚𝐧 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐨𝐜𝐜𝐚𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐭 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭’𝐬 𝐞𝐱𝐚𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐬 𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐝𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡. 𝐍𝐞𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐭 𝐚𝐧 𝐚𝐫𝐠𝐮𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐬𝐚𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐮𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐝𝐫𝐚𝐰 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐜𝐥𝐮𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐱𝐞𝐫𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐨𝐧, 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐦𝐚𝐝𝐞 𝐢𝐭 𝐪𝐮𝐢𝐭𝐞 𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐢𝐧, 𝐚𝐬 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐝𝐲 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐰𝐧, 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭’𝐬 𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐥𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐜 𝐩𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐢𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐮𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐇𝐢𝐦𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐟 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐭𝐚𝐤𝐞𝐧 𝐚𝐬 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐇𝐢𝐦𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐟.

𝐈𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐨𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐮𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐝𝐫𝐚𝐰𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐜𝐥𝐮𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐭𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐟 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐝.

𝐓𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐬 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐨𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐬 𝐰𝐞𝐥𝐥 𝐚𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐜𝐥𝐮𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐢𝐬 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧:

𝐓𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐎𝐮𝐫 𝐚𝐫𝐠𝐮𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭, 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐖𝐞 𝐠𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐀𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐡𝐚𝐦 𝐚𝐠𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐟𝐨𝐥𝐤 (𝟔:𝟖𝟑), 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐚 𝐰𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐜𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐨𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐀𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐡𝐚𝐦.

𝐓𝐨 𝐬𝐮𝐦 𝐮𝐩, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐒𝐮𝐧𝐧𝐚𝐡 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐝𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐝𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐥𝐲 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦 𝐚 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐭𝐨 𝐦𝐚𝐧. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐮𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 – 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐝𝐢𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐭𝐰𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐣𝐮𝐧𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐒𝐮𝐧𝐧𝐚𝐡 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐝𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐢𝐧𝐣𝐮𝐧𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐮𝐥𝐬𝐨𝐫𝐲 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐒𝐮𝐧𝐧𝐚𝐡, 𝐛𝐞𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐧 “𝐞𝐱𝐚𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞” 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐨𝐧𝐞’𝐬 𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲. 𝐁𝐮𝐭 𝐝𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐛𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐧𝐞𝐠𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐨𝐫, 𝐚𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 “𝐦𝐨𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐧𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬,” 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐭𝐞 𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐒𝐮𝐧𝐧𝐚𝐡 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐨𝐩𝐞𝐧 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐯𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐨𝐥𝐲 𝐁𝐨𝐨𝐤.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡

𝐈𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐚 𝐬𝐢𝐠𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐥𝐮𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐚 𝐠𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭 𝐝𝐞𝐚𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐥𝐨𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐭𝐚𝐥𝐤 𝐢𝐧 𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐦 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡, 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐟𝐚𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐜𝐢𝐫𝐜𝐥𝐞𝐬, 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐠𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭 𝐢𝐧 𝐚 𝐧𝐞𝐰𝐬𝐩𝐚𝐩𝐞𝐫 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐬𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐲 “𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐛𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐬 𝐚 𝐬𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐥𝐚𝐰.” 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠, 𝐨𝐟 𝐜𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐬𝐞, 𝐢𝐬 𝐛𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐦𝐢𝐬𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐝𝐨𝐞𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐨𝐰; 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐜 𝐨𝐟 𝐚 𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐛𝐢𝐚𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐬𝐰𝐞𝐞𝐩𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐥𝐥-𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐞𝐝 𝐫𝐞𝐦𝐚𝐫𝐤𝐬 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐚𝐲𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭, 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐥𝐮𝐝𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐒𝐮𝐧𝐧𝐚𝐡, 𝐨𝐫 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐩𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐞, 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐛𝐨𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐬 𝐚 𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐨𝐟 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐬 𝐚 𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐨𝐟 𝐟𝐚𝐜𝐭 𝐚 𝐬𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐥𝐚𝐰, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐬𝐨 𝐛𝐲 𝐃𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐧𝐞 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐲 𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐝𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐬 𝐞𝐱𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐥𝐲 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐨𝐝, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐃𝐚𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐉𝐮𝐝𝐠𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐧𝐞𝐱𝐭 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐥𝐝, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐢𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐩, 𝐨𝐫 𝐡𝐮𝐦𝐚𝐧 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐩𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐝 𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐢𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐞 𝐦𝐚𝐧 𝐦𝐮𝐬𝐭 𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐭𝐨𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐬 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐟𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐦𝐞𝐧; 𝐢𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐥𝐚𝐲𝐬 𝐝𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐜𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐥𝐚𝐰𝐬, 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐧𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐭𝐲, 𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐢𝐥𝐲 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐝, 𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐭𝐨𝐨𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐝, 𝐝𝐞𝐭𝐚𝐢𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐥𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐚𝐰 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐬𝐮𝐛𝐣𝐞𝐜𝐭, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡’𝐬 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐛𝐞 𝐝𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐇𝐢𝐬 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭.

𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐞𝐥𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐢𝐧 𝐆𝐨𝐝’𝐬 𝐦𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐦𝐚𝐧, 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐬𝐚𝐲, 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐩𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐥𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭, 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐜𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐫𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐭𝐨𝐨𝐝 𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐧 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐬𝐢𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐯𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐥 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦 𝐛𝐨𝐭𝐡 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐡𝐢𝐦𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐟 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬. 𝐔𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡’𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐝𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐥𝐨𝐩𝐞𝐝 𝐥𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐥 𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐡𝐢𝐦 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐜𝐜𝐞𝐩𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐯𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐲.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐊𝐡𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐟𝐚’ 𝐚𝐥-𝐑𝐚𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐝𝐮𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐬𝐮𝐫𝐯𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐚𝐟𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐒𝐮𝐧𝐧𝐚𝐡 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐚𝐧 𝐨𝐛𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐚𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐲 𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐥𝐚𝐰, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐭𝐨𝐨𝐤 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐚𝐮𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐫𝐞𝐪𝐮𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 “𝐨𝐛𝐞𝐲 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐨𝐛𝐞𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐫” 𝐢𝐧 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐇𝐢𝐬 𝐌𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐫 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐬𝐨𝐥𝐮𝐛𝐥𝐲 𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐤𝐞𝐝, 𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐢𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫, “𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐨𝐛𝐞𝐲𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐫 𝐨𝐛𝐞𝐲𝐬 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡”. 𝐈𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐧𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐢𝐧 𝐪𝐮𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐜 𝐡𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐒𝐮𝐧𝐧𝐚𝐡 𝐚𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐚𝐮𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐢𝐬, 𝐢𝐧 𝐝𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐥𝐨𝐩𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐥 𝐩𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐢𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐬 𝐥𝐚𝐢𝐝 𝐝𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧, 𝐚𝐧 𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐬𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐜𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐜 𝐥𝐞𝐠𝐢𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐮𝐭𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐦, 𝐦𝐨𝐬𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐬𝐮𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐟𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐛𝐚𝐜𝐤𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐧𝐨 𝐬𝐨𝐥𝐢𝐝 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰𝐥𝐞𝐝𝐠𝐞, 𝐨𝐟 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫-𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐡𝐮𝐬𝐢𝐚𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐜 𝐩𝐮𝐫𝐯𝐞𝐲𝐨𝐫𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐈𝐣𝐭𝐢𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐮𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐰𝐞 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧. 𝐕𝐞𝐫𝐲 𝐟𝐞𝐰 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐬, 𝐢𝐟 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦, 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐜𝐚𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐚 𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐩 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐮𝐧𝐛𝐢𝐚𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐬𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐞, 𝐦𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐨𝐟 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐯𝐚𝐢𝐥𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐀𝐫𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐜, 𝐞𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐚𝐥𝐲𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐤𝐬.

𝐅𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐚𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐢𝐧 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐟𝐮𝐧𝐜𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐲 𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐢𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐢𝐬 𝐚 𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐨𝐟 𝐠𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭 𝐬𝐨𝐫𝐫𝐨𝐰, 𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐢𝐟𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠, 𝐠𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐠𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐚𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐬𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐩 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐞 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐥𝐝. 𝐏𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐲 𝐢𝐧 𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐨 𝐫𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐯𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐝𝐨𝐮𝐛𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐚𝐮𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐭𝐲, 𝐠𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐟𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐠𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬 𝐬𝐮𝐛𝐣𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐨𝐬𝐭 𝐫𝐢𝐠𝐨𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐬𝐜𝐫𝐮𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐜𝐚𝐦𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐲 𝐝𝐞𝐟𝐢𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐜𝐥𝐮𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬; 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐚 𝐩𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐰𝐨𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐟𝐮𝐥 𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐮𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐛𝐫𝐢𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐭 𝐬𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐩 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐛𝐞 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐦𝐢𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐚 𝐟𝐞𝐰 𝐠𝐥𝐢𝐛 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐬 𝐛𝐲 “𝐦𝐨𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐧𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬” 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐭𝐚𝐤𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐞𝐱𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐞 𝐢𝐭.

𝐍𝐨 𝐦𝐚𝐬𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐡𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐩𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐭𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐬, 𝐧𝐨𝐫 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐦𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐬𝐮𝐛𝐬𝐢𝐝𝐢𝐚𝐫𝐲 𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐬 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐢𝐨𝐠𝐫𝐚𝐩𝐡𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬, 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐅𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐅𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐅𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡, 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐜𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐛𝐨𝐝𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐬𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐬.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐞 𝐢𝐬 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐚𝐝𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐚 𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐢𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐟𝐢𝐧𝐞 𝐞𝐱𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐭 𝐰𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐬𝐞𝐞𝐦 𝐩𝐞𝐝𝐚𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐜 – 𝐢𝐟 𝐢𝐭 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐮𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐡𝐨𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐩𝐮𝐫𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐓𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬 – 𝐭𝐨 𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐧𝐨 𝐚𝐯𝐞𝐧𝐮𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐜𝐡 𝐮𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞𝐝.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐢𝐫𝐬𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐦𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐰 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐛𝐞𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐝𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐠𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐜𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐨𝐫 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐊𝐡𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐟𝐚’ 𝐚𝐥-𝐑𝐚𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐝𝐮𝐧, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐝𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐨𝐝 𝐛𝐞𝐭𝐰𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐮𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐫 𝐨𝐜𝐜𝐮𝐫𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐛𝐞𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐰𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐲 𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐛𝐞𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐝. 𝐒𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐠𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐬𝐨 𝐟𝐚𝐫 𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐬𝐚𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐞𝐜𝐚𝐮𝐬𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐮𝐧𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞.

𝐓𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐫 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐠𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐟𝐮𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐰𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠, 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐞, 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐚𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭’𝐬 𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞, 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐢𝐬 𝐠𝐨𝐨𝐝 𝐞𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐰 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐀𝐛𝐝𝐮𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐛.𝐀𝐦𝐫 𝐛. 𝐚𝐥-𝐀𝐬 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐨𝐧𝐞, 𝐮𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐰𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐞 𝐝𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐝 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐌𝐚𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐫.

𝐎𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐭𝐨𝐨 𝐩𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐜𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐨 𝐰𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐢𝐧 𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐞, 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐀𝐛𝐮 𝐇𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐲𝐫𝐚𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝𝐀𝐛𝐝𝐮𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐛. `𝐀𝐛𝐛𝐚𝐬, 𝐭𝐰𝐨 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐲 𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐭 𝐬𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐜𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡. 𝐁𝐮𝐭 𝐢𝐧 𝐠𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐢𝐭 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐛𝐞 𝐬𝐚𝐢𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐬 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐩𝐫𝐢𝐯𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐥𝐲 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐰𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐠𝐞𝐬.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐪𝐮𝐢𝐭𝐞 𝐜𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐫 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐦𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐀𝐫𝐚𝐛𝐬’ 𝐚𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐡𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐰𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐨𝐝 𝐢𝐬 𝐰𝐞𝐥𝐥-𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰𝐧, 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐲 𝐟𝐞𝐰 𝐨𝐟 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞. 𝐇𝐮𝐠𝐞 𝐬𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰𝐥𝐞𝐝𝐠𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐠𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐩𝐨𝐞𝐭𝐫𝐲 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐝𝐢𝐠𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐦𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐬; 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐩𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐭𝐞 𝐚 𝐡𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐬𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞𝐬. 𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐧𝐨 𝐛𝐨𝐨𝐤𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐜𝐮𝐫𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐲 𝐚𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦; 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐝𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭’𝐬 𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐝𝐢𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐜𝐢𝐫𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐛𝐨𝐨𝐤 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐚𝐜𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭’𝐬 𝐬𝐚𝐲𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬, 𝐥𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐥 𝐝𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐝𝐬, 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐠𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐰𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐧 𝐝𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐬𝐮𝐫𝐩𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐭. 𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐞𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐠𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐰𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐢𝐧 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐟𝐞𝐚𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐰𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐛𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐦𝐢𝐱𝐞𝐝 𝐮𝐩 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧, 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐲𝐞𝐭 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐟𝐮𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐞𝐝, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐲𝐞𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐭𝐞𝐥𝐲 𝐟𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐚𝐫. 𝐁𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐬𝐚𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐡𝐞 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐦𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐟, 𝐨𝐫 𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐮𝐩𝐨𝐧 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡; 𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐫𝐲, 𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐧 𝐢𝐭.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬, 𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐥𝐮𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐊𝐡𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐟𝐚’ 𝐚𝐥-𝐑𝐝𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐝𝐮𝐧, 𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐚𝐛𝐬𝐨𝐫𝐛𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬, 𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐥𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐝𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐥𝐨𝐩𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐢𝐧 𝐚𝐝𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐬𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐢𝐭𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐟.

𝐖𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐩𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐰𝐚𝐲 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐥𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐂𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐩𝐡𝐬 𝐜𝐚𝐦𝐞, 𝐚𝐟𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐝𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐛𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐜𝐚𝐦𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐜𝐥𝐮𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐧 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐩𝐮𝐛𝐥𝐢𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐢𝐧 𝐚 𝐛𝐨𝐨𝐤 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐠𝐞, 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐚𝐦𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭’𝐬 𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞, 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐖𝐨𝐫𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐦𝐮𝐬𝐭 𝐛𝐞 𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐧𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐢𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐛𝐬𝐨𝐫𝐛𝐞𝐝 𝐟𝐢𝐫𝐬𝐭, 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐥𝐞 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐩𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐥𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐛𝐞 𝐡𝐚𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐝 𝐝𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐛𝐲 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐦𝐨𝐮𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐞𝐱𝐚𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞.

𝐁𝐮𝐭 𝐢𝐟 𝐰𝐞 𝐥𝐨𝐨𝐤 𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐝𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐊𝐡𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐟𝐚’ 𝐚𝐥-𝐑𝐚𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐝𝐮𝐧, 𝐰𝐞 𝐟𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐧 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐲 𝐜𝐚𝐬𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐝𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐭 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐥𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧, 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐭 𝐨𝐛𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐚𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐜𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐬𝐢𝐭𝐮𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐦𝐚𝐝𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐝𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐜𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐟𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬. 𝐓𝐨 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐯𝐞𝐧𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐯𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐥 𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐞𝐲𝐞𝐬 𝐞𝐪𝐮𝐢𝐯𝐚𝐥𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐯𝐞𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦 𝐢𝐭𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐟.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐨𝐝 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐰𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐯𝐚𝐥𝐮𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭’𝐬 𝐩𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐞, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐩𝐨𝐢𝐧𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐢𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐭𝐞 𝐮𝐧𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐦𝐢𝐭𝐲. 𝐈𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐚 𝐠𝐫𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐦𝐢𝐬-𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐬𝐚𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐔𝐦𝐚𝐫 𝐚𝐥-𝐊𝐡𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐚𝐛 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐠𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐟 𝐓𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬; 𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐠𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭 𝐜𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐨𝐨𝐤 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦, 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐛𝐞 𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐧𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰𝐧.

𝐇𝐞 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐜𝐞𝐫𝐭𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐜𝐭 𝐚𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐬 𝐚𝐜𝐜𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐫𝐞𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐥𝐰𝐚𝐲𝐬 𝐝𝐞𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐝 𝐚 𝐬𝐮𝐩𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐢𝐟 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐫 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡; 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐡𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐜𝐜𝐞𝐩𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐓𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐧𝐨 𝐟𝐮𝐫𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧. 𝐈𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐜𝐚𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐜𝐚𝐦𝐞 𝐮𝐩 𝐛𝐞𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐡𝐢𝐦 𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐮𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰𝐥𝐞𝐝𝐠𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭'𝐬 𝐫𝐮𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐟 𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐢𝐦𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐟 𝐝𝐢𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰𝐥𝐞𝐝𝐠𝐞 𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬; 𝐨𝐧 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐪𝐮𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐟𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐬𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐬𝐟𝐲𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐡𝐢𝐦𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐟 𝐫𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐚𝐜𝐜𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐲, 𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐦𝐦𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐮𝐩𝐨𝐧 𝐢𝐭.

𝐈𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐝, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐚𝐜𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐬 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐭𝐞𝐥𝐲 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐰𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐝𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐧𝐨 𝐝𝐫𝐚𝐰𝐛𝐚𝐜𝐤; 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐯𝐞𝐬 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐥𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐦𝐨𝐝𝐞𝐥𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐩𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐮𝐫𝐞-𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐬𝐚𝐲𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬. 𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐬𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐝 𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐮𝐠𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐧𝐨𝐰 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐭𝐮𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐜 𝐞𝐦𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐞, 𝐭𝐨 𝐊𝐮𝐟𝐚𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐁𝐚𝐬𝐫𝐚𝐡 𝐢𝐧 𝐈𝐫𝐚𝐪, 𝐭𝐨 𝐒𝐲𝐫𝐢𝐚, 𝐏𝐚𝐥𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐞, 𝐄𝐠𝐲𝐩𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐊𝐡𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐬𝐚𝐧. 𝐇𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐬𝐮𝐫𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐞𝐚𝐠𝐞𝐫 𝐩𝐮𝐩𝐢𝐥𝐬 𝐛𝐨𝐭𝐡 𝐀𝐫𝐚𝐛 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐧-𝐀𝐫𝐚𝐛, 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐫𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐨 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐬𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐥𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐝 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐡𝐢𝐦.

𝐒𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐩𝐮𝐩𝐢𝐥𝐬, 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐅𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 (𝐓𝐝𝐛𝐢𝐮𝐧), 𝐛𝐞𝐜𝐚𝐦𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐨𝐰𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐜 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐥𝐝 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐒𝐮𝐧𝐧𝐚𝐡, 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐫𝐞𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐩𝐢𝐞𝐭𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐩𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐞. 𝐒𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐇𝐚𝐬𝐚𝐧 𝐁𝐚𝐬𝐫𝐢, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐨𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐈𝐦𝐫𝐚𝐧 𝐛. 𝐇𝐮𝐬𝐚𝐲𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐀𝐧𝐚𝐬 𝐛. 𝐌𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐤 𝐢𝐧 𝐁𝐚𝐬𝐫𝐚𝐡; 𝐀𝐥𝐪𝐚𝐦𝐚 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐀𝐬𝐰𝐚𝐝, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐢𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐚𝐬𝐭 𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐟𝐀𝐛𝐝𝐮𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐛. 𝐌𝐚𝐬’𝐣𝐢𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐊𝐮𝐟𝐚𝐡, 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐮𝐩𝐢𝐥𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐔𝐦𝐚𝐫 𝐚𝐧𝐝𝐀’𝐢𝐬𝐡𝐚𝐡; 𝐒𝐚𝐢𝐝 𝐛. 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐚𝐢𝐲𝐢𝐛, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐮𝐩𝐢𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐛𝐮 𝐇𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐲𝐫𝐚𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐓𝐚𝐮𝐬, 𝐌𝐮𝐣𝐚𝐡𝐢𝐝, 𝐀𝐭𝐚' 𝐛. 𝐀𝐌 𝐑𝐚𝐛𝐚𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐬; 𝐍𝐚𝐟𝐢, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐮𝐩𝐢𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐀'𝐢𝐬𝐡𝐚𝐡, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐡𝐨𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐬𝐭𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐮𝐧𝐪𝐮𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐞𝐝.

𝐇𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭𝐀’𝐢𝐬𝐡𝐚𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐀𝐛𝐮 𝐇𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐲𝐫𝐚𝐡 𝐥𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐝 𝐮𝐩 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞𝐭𝐰𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝟓𝟎 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝟔𝟎 𝐀.𝐇, 𝐀𝐛𝐝𝐮𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐛.𝐀𝐛𝐛𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐀𝐛𝐝𝐮𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐛.𝐔𝐦𝐚𝐫 𝐭𝐨 𝐚𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝 𝟕𝟎 𝐀.𝐇., 𝐀𝐛𝐮 𝐒𝐚𝐢𝐝 𝐊𝐡𝐮𝐝𝐫𝐢 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞𝐭𝐰𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝟕𝟎 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝟖𝟎 𝐀.𝐇. 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐀𝐧𝐚𝐬 𝐛. 𝐌𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐤 𝐭𝐨 𝟗𝟎 𝐀.𝐇. 𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐬𝐚𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐚𝐥𝐟 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐢𝐫𝐬𝐭 𝐜𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐢𝐣𝐫𝐚𝐡 𝐢𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫 𝐚 𝐠𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭 𝐬𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐬𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐨𝐫 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐝𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐫 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐡𝐢𝐦𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐟.

𝐍𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐚𝐦𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐓𝐚𝐛𝐢 𝐮𝐧 𝐰𝐞 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐣𝐮𝐬𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐰, 𝐥𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐝 𝐮𝐩 𝐭𝐨 𝐝𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐭𝐰𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝟗𝟎 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝟏𝟐𝟎 𝐀.𝐇., 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐦𝐞𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐮𝐩 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐟𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐯𝐚𝐢𝐥𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐰𝐢𝐬𝐡𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦. 𝐁𝐞𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐢𝐫𝐬𝐭 𝐪𝐮𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐝 𝐜𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐲 (𝟏𝟎𝟎-𝟏𝟐𝟓 𝐀.𝐇.) 𝐜𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐛𝐨𝐨𝐤 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐜𝐮𝐫𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐭, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡 𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐓𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐮𝐧 𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐩𝐫𝐢𝐯𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐰𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐧 𝐜𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐛𝐚𝐬𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐛𝐚𝐥, 𝐚𝐬 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐚𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐝𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐞𝐫𝐚 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰𝐥𝐞𝐝𝐠𝐞 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐢𝐟 𝐰𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐧 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐰𝐚𝐲𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐢𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐦𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐲.

𝐈𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐢𝐫𝐬𝐭 𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐠𝐞-𝐬𝐜𝐚𝐥𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐛𝐨𝐨𝐤 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦 𝐛𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐦𝐚𝐝𝐞, 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐛𝐲 𝐈𝐛𝐧 𝐉𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐲𝐣, 𝐌𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐤, 𝐒𝐮𝐟𝐲𝐚𝐧 𝐓𝐡𝐚𝐰𝐫𝐢, 𝐌𝐚’𝐦𝐚𝐫 𝐛. 𝐑𝐚𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐬, 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐩𝐮𝐩𝐢𝐥𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐓𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐮𝐧. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐚 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐦𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞 𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐩𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐞𝐭𝐰𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐠𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐟𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐢𝐧 𝐛𝐨𝐨𝐤 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐬 𝐰𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐮𝐧𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐢𝐬 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐭𝐞𝐥𝐲 𝐮𝐧𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐝 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐡𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐲 𝐚𝐬 𝐠𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐯𝐞 𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐥𝐲 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐝, 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐫𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐫𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐜𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬, 𝐚𝐥𝐦𝐨𝐬𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐰𝐚𝐲 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐜𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐚𝐥-𝐁𝐮𝐤𝐡𝐚𝐫𝐢 𝐞𝐭𝐜., 𝐚 𝐜𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐲 𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐫.

𝐁𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐢𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐢𝐬𝐡𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐞𝐥𝐥-𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐓𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐮𝐧 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐜𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐨𝐨𝐤 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦 𝐨𝐫 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐯𝐚𝐢𝐥𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐯𝐞𝐬 𝐮𝐩 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐢𝐫𝐬𝐭 𝐪𝐮𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐝 𝐜𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐢𝐣𝐫𝐚𝐡, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐭 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐫𝐞𝐪𝐮𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐰𝐨 𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐞𝐞 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐜𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐬𝐭𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐡𝐲 𝐬𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐨 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐯𝐞𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐭𝐨 𝐚𝐥-𝐁𝐮𝐤𝐡𝐚𝐂 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐦𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐬.

𝐈𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐧𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐫𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐛𝐞𝐭𝐰𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐩𝐮𝐛𝐥𝐢𝐬𝐡𝐞𝐝 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐢𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐥-𝐁𝐮𝐤𝐡𝐚𝐫𝐢’𝐬 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐠𝐞 𝐜𝐥𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐞𝐝 𝐜𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐠𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐨𝐟 `𝐀𝐛𝐝𝐮𝐫 𝐑𝐚𝐳𝐚𝐪 (𝐝𝐢𝐞𝐝 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐟𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝟐𝟎𝟎 𝐀.𝐇.), 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐮𝐩𝐢𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐈𝐛𝐧 𝐉𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐲𝐣, 𝐒𝐮𝐟𝐲𝐚𝐧 𝐓𝐡𝐚𝐰𝐫𝐢, 𝐌𝐚’𝐦𝐚𝐫 𝐛. 𝐑𝐚𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐌𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐤, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐫 𝐜𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐬. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐪𝐮𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐮𝐧𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞, 𝐰𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐫 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐜𝐨𝐜𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐨𝐟 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐬𝐨 𝐦𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐟𝐮𝐬𝐬 𝐢𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐦𝐚𝐝𝐞 𝐛𝐲 𝐢𝐥𝐥-𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐞𝐝 𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐬 𝐭𝐨𝐝𝐚𝐲?

𝐈𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐮𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐬𝐭𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐡𝐲 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐫 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐞𝐱𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐞𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐡𝐲 𝐞𝐱𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐝𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐫𝐚 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐊𝐡𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐟𝐚’ 𝐚𝐥-𝐑𝐚𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐝𝐮𝐧. 𝐈𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐒𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐬𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐞𝐚𝐫 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐊𝐡𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐣𝐢𝐬, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐝𝐲𝐧𝐚𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐜 𝐜𝐥𝐚𝐬𝐡𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐁𝐚𝐧𝐮 𝐔𝐦𝐚𝐲𝐲𝐚𝐡, 𝐁𝐚𝐧𝐮 𝐀𝐛𝐛𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐁𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐇𝐚𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐦 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐯𝐮𝐥𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐔𝐦𝐦𝐚𝐡, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐟𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐲𝐫𝐝𝐨𝐦 𝐨𝐟 𝐈𝐦𝐚𝐦 𝐇𝐮𝐬𝐚𝐲𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐟𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐭 𝐊𝐚𝐫𝐛𝐚𝐥𝐚', 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐬𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐫 𝐢𝐧𝐯𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐨 𝐣𝐮𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐟𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐜𝐥𝐚𝐢𝐦𝐬.

𝐁𝐮𝐭 𝐢𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐧𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐥 𝐬𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐫𝐞𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐬, 𝐧𝐨𝐫 𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐩𝐮𝐫𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐝𝐨𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐬𝐨; 𝐮𝐧𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐓𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐩𝐮𝐫𝐯𝐞𝐲𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐮𝐧𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐩𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐬𝐚𝐧𝐬, 𝐩𝐨𝐩𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐫 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐬, 𝐬𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐲-𝐭𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐨 𝐨𝐧, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐞𝐬𝐜𝐚𝐩𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐚𝐠𝐥𝐞 𝐞𝐲𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐲 𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐌𝐮𝐡𝐚𝐝𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐮𝐧.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐨𝐥𝐢𝐝 𝐛𝐨𝐝𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐠𝐧𝐢𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐚𝐬𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐋𝐚𝐰 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐛𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐌𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐤 𝐚𝐬 𝐰𝐞𝐥𝐥 𝐚𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐝𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐛𝐮 𝐇𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐟𝐚𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐈𝐦𝐚𝐦𝐬. 𝐈𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐝𝐢𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐨𝐩𝐢𝐧𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐭 𝐩𝐨𝐢𝐧𝐭 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐦𝐨𝐬𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐰𝐚𝐲𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐝𝐢𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐚𝐥𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐝𝐲 𝐞𝐱𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬.

𝐖𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐦𝐚𝐫𝐤𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐥𝐚𝐰 𝐛𝐚𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫'𝐚𝐧, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐒𝐮𝐧𝐧𝐚𝐡 𝐚𝐬 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐀𝐛𝐮 𝐇𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐟𝐚𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐌𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐤, 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞, 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐝𝐢𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐝𝐞𝐭𝐚𝐢𝐥 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐱𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐫𝐲 𝐚𝐠𝐫𝐞𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐢𝐧 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐦𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐜𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐞, 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐧 𝐚𝐠𝐫𝐞𝐞𝐝 𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐩𝐮𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐒𝐮𝐧𝐧𝐚𝐡 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐨𝐭𝐡 𝐬𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐨𝐥𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐭.

𝐈𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐚 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐨𝐧 𝐟𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐜𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐚𝐤 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐜𝐜𝐞𝐩𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐨𝐨𝐤𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐥 𝐁𝐮𝐤𝐡𝐚𝐫𝐢, 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦, 𝐚𝐥-𝐓𝐢𝐫𝐦𝐢𝐝𝐡𝐢, 𝐞𝐭𝐜., 𝐚𝐬 𝐢𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐯𝐞𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐭𝐮𝐭𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐜 𝐅𝐢𝐪𝐡. 𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐜𝐞𝐫𝐭𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐝𝐝𝐮𝐜𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐮𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐣𝐮𝐝𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐲, 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐟𝐭𝐞𝐧 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐠𝐨𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐞 𝐟𝐚𝐛𝐫𝐢𝐜 𝐨𝐟 𝐅𝐢𝐪𝐡 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐞𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐛𝐨𝐫𝐧.

𝐀𝐛𝐮 𝐇𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐟𝐚𝐡 𝐡𝐢𝐦𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐟 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐨𝐫𝐧 𝐢𝐧 𝟖𝟎 𝐀.𝐇. 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐯𝐞, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐮𝐩𝐢𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐚𝐦𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐓𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐮𝐧 𝐰𝐞 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐯𝐞, 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐀𝐭𝐚' 𝐛. 𝐀𝐛𝐢 𝐑𝐚𝐛𝐚𝐡 𝐢𝐧 𝐌𝐚𝐤𝐤𝐚𝐡. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐨𝐝𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐮𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐀𝐛𝐮 𝐇𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐟𝐚𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐌𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐤 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐟𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐡 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐓𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐮𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐮𝐧𝐬𝐮𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐬𝐚𝐧 𝐩𝐨𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐦𝐚𝐠𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐩𝐨𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬, 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐢𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐜𝐚𝐬𝐞 𝐚𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐭𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐥𝐚𝐰 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐲 𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐭𝐥𝐞. 𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐜𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬, 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐮𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐀𝐛𝐮 𝐇𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐟𝐚𝐡 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐡𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐲𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐬 𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐫.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐫𝐞𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐢𝐨𝐠𝐫𝐚𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐈𝐦𝐚𝐦 𝐚𝐥-𝐁𝐮𝐤𝐡𝐚𝐫𝐢 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝟕,𝟎𝟎𝟎 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐬 𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝟔𝟎𝟎,𝟎𝟎𝟎 𝐢𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐩𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐦𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐮𝐬𝐞 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐝𝐞𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐨 𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐦𝐩𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐰 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐚𝐣𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐮𝐧𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞. 𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐦𝐚𝐝𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐞𝐱𝐭𝐨𝐥 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐮𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐨𝐢𝐧𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐯𝐢𝐞𝐰 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐫𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐠𝐨 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐩𝐥𝐲 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐯𝐨𝐢𝐝 𝐫𝐚𝐬𝐡 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐜𝐥𝐮𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐝𝐨 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦 𝐭𝐨 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲.

𝐈𝐧 𝐜𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐛𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐢𝐬 𝐠𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐧 𝐚𝐥-𝐁𝐮𝐤𝐡𝐚𝐫𝐢’𝐬 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐚 𝐯𝐚𝐬𝐭, 𝐮𝐧𝐜𝐥𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐞𝐝 𝐦𝐚𝐬𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐲 𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐟𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐞, 𝐟𝐥𝐨𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐜 𝐞𝐦𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐞, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐮𝐝𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐜𝐞𝐧𝐞, 𝐬𝐞𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐞 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐞, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐟𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝟕,𝟎𝟎𝟎 𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝟔𝟎𝟎,𝟎𝟎𝟎.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐥 𝐟𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐦𝐛𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐥. 𝐂𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐦 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐜𝐫𝐮𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐝𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐲 𝐛𝐞𝐠𝐢𝐧𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠, 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐅𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐬, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐚𝐥𝐰𝐚𝐲𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐚 𝐜𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐮𝐧𝐪𝐮𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐞 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐭, 𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐩𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐬𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐬. 𝐅𝐨𝐫 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐌𝐮𝐡𝐚𝐦𝐦𝐚𝐝 𝐛. 𝐇𝐚𝐬𝐚𝐧, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐨𝐰𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐩𝐮𝐩𝐢𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐛𝐮 𝐇𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐟𝐚𝐡, 𝐨𝐧 𝐌𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐤’𝐬 𝐛𝐨𝐨𝐤 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐮𝐰𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐚’, 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐰 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐧 𝐚 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐬𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐫 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐪𝐮𝐨𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐌𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐤, 𝐀𝐛𝐮 𝐇𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐟𝐚𝐡 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐝𝐢𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐞𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐫𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐚𝐮𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐭𝐲, 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚 𝐝𝐢𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐫𝐮𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐠.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐢𝐬𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐞𝐟 𝐨𝐟 𝐟𝐚𝐛𝐫𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐫 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐠𝐮𝐧, 𝐝𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐨𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐛𝐞𝐭𝐰𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐁𝐚𝐧𝐮 𝐇𝐚𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐦 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐔𝐦𝐚𝐲𝐲𝐚𝐝𝐬, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐟𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐜𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐊𝐚𝐫𝐛𝐚𝐥𝐚’, 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐮𝐧𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐩𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐬𝐞𝐝. 𝐁𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐮𝐧𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐜𝐢𝐫𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐬𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐭𝐰𝐨 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐮𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐬𝐮𝐩𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐬; 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐰𝐞𝐥𝐥 𝐚𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐭𝐚𝐦𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐞 𝐒𝐮𝐧𝐧𝐚𝐡 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐜𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐦𝐧𝐞𝐝.

𝐀 𝐬𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐧 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐟𝐚𝐛𝐫𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐣𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐜𝐥𝐚𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐜𝐫𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐛𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐰 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐥𝐲, 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞, 𝐚𝐥-𝐒𝐡𝐚’𝐛𝐢, 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐓𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐮𝐧 𝐢𝐧 𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰𝐥𝐞𝐝𝐠𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐥𝐚𝐰, 𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐥𝐲 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐦𝐧𝐬 𝐯𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐩𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐦𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐬𝐚𝐧 𝐫𝐞𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐬 𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐛𝐮𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐰𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐠𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐨𝐀𝐥𝐢. 𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐟𝐚𝐛𝐫𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐜𝐮𝐫𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐲 𝐚𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐠𝐧𝐨𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐭, 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐚𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐬.

𝐀 𝐬𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐝 𝐛𝐫𝐞𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠-𝐠𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐞𝐱𝐚𝐠𝐠𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐮𝐛𝐥𝐢𝐜 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐲-𝐭𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐫𝐬, 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐰𝐞𝐚𝐤𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐝𝐚𝐲. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐨𝐨𝐤𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐢𝐨𝐠𝐫𝐚𝐩𝐡𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐟𝐮𝐥𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐦𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐩𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐲𝐩𝐞, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐞𝐟𝐟𝐮𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬, 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡 𝐠𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐜𝐮𝐫𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐲 𝐚𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐮𝐧𝐥𝐞𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐝, 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐧𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐚𝐜𝐜𝐞𝐩𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐧𝐞𝐝.

𝐀𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐭𝐰𝐨 𝐦𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐬𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐜𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐟𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐮𝐧𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐝𝐮𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐦𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐡𝐮𝐦𝐚𝐧 𝐰𝐞𝐚𝐤𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐬, 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐚𝐬 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐠𝐞𝐭𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠, 𝐦𝐢𝐱𝐢𝐧𝐠-𝐮𝐩, 𝐞𝐱𝐚𝐠𝐠𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐚𝐬𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐛𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐡𝐢𝐦𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐟 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐨 𝐨𝐧. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐞 𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞𝐚𝐫 𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐰𝐞𝐚𝐤 𝐫𝐞𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐬, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐚𝐧 𝐚𝐦𝐚𝐳𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡 𝐬𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐦 𝐨𝐟 𝐚𝐧𝐚𝐥𝐲𝐬𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐮𝐭𝐞 𝐜𝐡𝐞𝐜𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠, 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐝𝐞𝐟𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐬 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐛𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐜𝐚𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐮𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐜𝐥𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐞𝐝.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐦𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐬𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐜𝐡 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐠𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐜𝐚𝐧𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐛𝐞 𝐢𝐦𝐚𝐠𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐬𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐲 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐞𝐥𝐥-𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐢𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬. 𝐓𝐨 𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐟 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐚𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐝, 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐠𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐬𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐚𝐬 𝐀𝐬𝐪𝐚𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐢'𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐫𝐲 𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐥 𝐁𝐮𝐤𝐡𝐚𝐫𝐢, 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐚 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐫 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐞𝐝 𝐦𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐨𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐲.

𝐀𝐟𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐚 𝐬𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐡𝐨𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐜𝐥𝐮𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐡 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐝𝐢𝐟𝐟𝐢𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐭 𝐢𝐟 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐚𝐫𝐫𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐚𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐲𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐚𝐦𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐜𝐥𝐮𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐠𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐬𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐬. 𝐖𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐫𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐫𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐫𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐥 𝐁𝐮𝐤𝐡𝐚𝐫𝐢'𝐬 𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡, 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐧𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐫𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐠𝐮𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬, 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐚 𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐥𝐞 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐬 𝐚 𝐬𝐞𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡, 𝐨𝐫 𝐚𝐧 𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐰𝐨 𝐨𝐫 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐝𝐢𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐨𝐧𝐬.

𝐅𝐨𝐫 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐚𝐦𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐫𝐞𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲𝐔𝐦𝐚𝐫, “𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐣𝐮𝐝𝐠𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬,” 𝐢𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝟕𝟎𝟎 𝐝𝐢𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐚𝐮𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐞𝐬. 𝐈𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬, 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐬 𝟕𝟎𝟎 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐬. 𝐓𝐡𝐮𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐠𝐞 𝐧𝐮𝐦𝐛𝐞𝐫 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐮𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐝𝐢𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐭, 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐯𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐚 𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐥𝐞 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡.

𝐈𝐧 𝐬𝐮𝐦, 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐫𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐥-𝐁𝐮𝐤𝐡𝐚𝐫𝐢’𝐬 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐦𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐭𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐬𝐚𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐨𝐨𝐤 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐬𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐬, 𝐛𝐨𝐭𝐡 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐮𝐧𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞, 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐞𝐱𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐰𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐧 𝐨𝐫 𝐮𝐧𝐰𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐧 𝐢𝐧 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐝𝐚𝐲. 𝐁𝐮𝐭 𝐢𝐭 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐛𝐞 𝐢𝐦𝐚𝐠𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐢𝐫𝐬𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐝𝐞𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐞 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐞; 𝐚 𝐠𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐠𝐫𝐞𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐨𝐝𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐠𝐨𝐨𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐫 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐝𝐲 𝐢𝐧 𝐞𝐱𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬.

𝐀𝐥-𝐁𝐮𝐤𝐡𝐚𝐫𝐢 𝐚𝐝𝐝𝐞𝐝 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐮𝐧𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐜𝐮𝐦𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐚 𝐟𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐞𝐱𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐢𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐚 𝐝𝐞𝐟𝐢𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐲 𝐛𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐚𝐮𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐲. 𝐓𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐧𝐠𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐮𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐢𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐛𝐞 𝐰𝐞𝐥𝐥 𝐚𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐝𝐨𝐢𝐧𝐠; 𝐢𝐭 𝐫𝐞𝐪𝐮𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐬 𝐚 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐞𝐱𝐜𝐞𝐩𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐮𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐡 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐚 𝐩𝐮𝐩𝐢𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐠𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭 𝐌𝐮𝐡𝐚𝐝𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐮𝐧. 𝐓𝐨 𝐬𝐮𝐫𝐩𝐚𝐬𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐰𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐫𝐞𝐪𝐮𝐢𝐫𝐞 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐮𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐟𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐛𝐢𝐚𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐨𝐝𝐚𝐲, 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐯𝐞𝐬 𝐜𝐚𝐩𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐤 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐟𝐢𝐞𝐥𝐝 𝐮𝐩 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐭.

𝐖𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐰 𝐭𝐨 𝐚 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐲 𝐜𝐫𝐮𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫. 𝐈𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐛𝐞 𝐫𝐞-𝐞𝐱𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐧 𝐚 𝐧𝐞𝐰 𝐛𝐚𝐬𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐚 𝐯𝐢𝐞𝐰 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐝 𝐞𝐧𝐯𝐢𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭. 𝐍𝐨 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐲𝐞𝐭 𝐠𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐭 𝐢𝐧𝐤𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐟 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐛𝐚𝐬𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞, 𝐞𝐱𝐜𝐞𝐩𝐭 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐡𝐚𝐩𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐭 𝐰𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐛𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐛𝐢𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐫𝐲 𝐟𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞-𝐞𝐱𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐬. 𝐖𝐞 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐧 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐚𝐥-𝐁𝐮𝐤𝐡𝐚𝐫𝐢’𝐬 𝐛𝐚𝐬𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐬, 𝐥𝐞𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐚 𝐧𝐞𝐰 𝐨𝐧𝐞. 𝐁𝐮𝐭 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐭𝐮𝐭𝐞𝐬 𝐞𝐱𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐝 𝐞𝐧𝐯𝐢𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭?

𝐖𝐞 𝐦𝐮𝐬𝐭 𝐛𝐞 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐲 𝐜𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐫 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐥 𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐧𝐠𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐨𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐧 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐥𝐝 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐚𝐤𝐞𝐧 𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐜𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐡𝐲𝐬𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐯𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐦𝐚𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜 𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐮𝐬, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬, 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐯𝐞𝐥, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐮𝐛𝐥𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐛𝐨𝐨𝐤𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐟 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐚𝐯𝐚𝐢𝐥𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐦𝐚𝐬𝐬-𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐝𝐮𝐜𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐨𝐨𝐤𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐥𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐬𝐚𝐯𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐝𝐞𝐯𝐢𝐜𝐞𝐬.

𝐁𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐮𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐦𝐚𝐧 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐝, 𝐧𝐨𝐫 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐝, 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐛𝐚𝐬𝐢𝐜 𝐩𝐡𝐲𝐬𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐞; 𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐞𝐚𝐭, 𝐬𝐥𝐞𝐞𝐩, 𝐰𝐚𝐬𝐡, 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞 𝐡𝐢𝐦𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐟, 𝐦𝐚𝐫𝐫𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐛𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐮𝐩 𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐥𝐝𝐫𝐞𝐧, 𝐟𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐡𝐞𝐥𝐭𝐞𝐫, 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐤 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐛𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐞 𝐚 𝐟𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐞. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐢𝐜𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐞 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐨𝐮𝐭𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐞 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐚𝐦𝐞.

𝐀𝐧𝐲 𝐚𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐥𝐚𝐰 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐧𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐯𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐚𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐞 𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐟𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐣𝐮𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐞𝐝. 𝐁𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐲𝐩𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐧𝐠𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐰𝐚𝐲𝐬 𝐥𝐮𝐫𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐲 𝐨𝐫 𝐬𝐮𝐛𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐲 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 “𝐦𝐨𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐧𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬”, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐧𝐠𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐡𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐝𝐮𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐞𝐢𝐠𝐧 𝐝𝐨𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐩𝐡𝐲𝐬𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐝𝐨𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧. 𝐌𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐡𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐭𝐬, 𝐛𝐨𝐭𝐡 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐯𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐚𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐥, 𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐥𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐝𝐞𝐬𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐬𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐮𝐥𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐛𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐢𝐭𝐲.

𝐌𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐦 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐤𝐞𝐩𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐦 𝐝𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐨𝐝𝐚𝐲 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐭 𝐠𝐞𝐧𝐮𝐢𝐧𝐞 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐬𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐲 𝐚 𝐰𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐧 𝐡𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐭. 𝐌𝐨𝐬𝐭, 𝐢𝐟 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐥, 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐨𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐧 𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐞𝐱𝐞𝐫𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐨𝐫 𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐠𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐪𝐮𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐛𝐨𝐫𝐫𝐨𝐰 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐦 𝐨𝐟 𝐰𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐧 𝐰𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐮𝐬𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐚𝐫𝐠𝐮𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐬.

𝐖𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐧 𝐝𝐞𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐛𝐞 𝐝𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐰𝐨 𝐦𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐠𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐬: 𝐬𝐜𝐞𝐩𝐭𝐢𝐜 𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐦𝐢𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐬. 𝐀𝐥𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐨𝐫 𝐛𝐨𝐭𝐡 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐠𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐯𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬. 𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐛𝐮𝐭𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐢𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐨𝐭𝐡 𝐨𝐟 -𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦; 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐮𝐧𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐚 𝐑𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐋𝐚𝐰.

𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐢𝐧 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦 𝐢𝐬 𝐛𝐚𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐣𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐢𝐬𝐡 𝐋𝐚𝐰, 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐞𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐟𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐉𝐞𝐬𝐮𝐬’ 𝐫𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐯𝐚𝐥 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐥𝐝, 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐬. 𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐣𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐦𝐨𝐥𝐝𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐖𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐬𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐧𝐨𝐰 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐠𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭 𝐝𝐢𝐟𝐟𝐢𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐭𝐲 𝐢𝐧 𝐚𝐜𝐜𝐞𝐩𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐛𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐚 𝐥𝐚𝐰 𝐥𝐚𝐢𝐝 𝐝𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫 𝐃𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐧𝐞 𝐈𝐧𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧. 𝐒𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐢𝐫𝐬𝐭 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐨𝐧 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐦 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐧 𝐢𝐧𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐝𝐞𝐟𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐝.

𝐀𝐬 𝐟𝐚𝐫 𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐜𝐞𝐩𝐭𝐢𝐜 𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐫𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐝𝐨 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐥, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐦 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐟𝐟 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐛𝐚𝐬𝐢𝐜 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐣𝐮𝐝𝐠𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭. 𝐖𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐧 𝐢𝐧𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐩𝐞𝐝 𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐟 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐨𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐠𝐨𝐨𝐝 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐦𝐚𝐧, 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐮𝐦𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐜𝐚𝐧𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐦𝐮𝐬𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐢𝐧𝐯𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐝, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐮𝐬𝐞 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐮𝐧𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜 𝐚𝐫𝐠𝐮𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐦𝐩𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐯𝐞 𝐢𝐭.

𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐢𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦, 𝐢𝐧 𝐟𝐚𝐜𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬, 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐚 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫; 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐛𝐯𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐚 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐭𝐨 𝐚𝐝𝐨𝐩𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐢𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐞 𝐨𝐫 𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐮𝐬𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐲 𝐩𝐨𝐨𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐫𝐠𝐮𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐬 𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐛𝐬𝐮𝐫𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐟-𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐜𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐲.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐝 𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐠𝐨𝐫𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐢𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐫 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐢𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐫𝐲 𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐢𝐭; 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐠𝐢𝐧𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐢𝐠𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦 𝐛𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐦𝐞𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐡𝐚𝐧𝐝. 𝐀𝐥𝐥 𝐰𝐞𝐚𝐩𝐨𝐧𝐬, 𝐡𝐨𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐭, 𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐫𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥, 𝐯𝐢𝐫𝐭𝐮𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐯𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐯𝐢𝐞𝐰. 𝐓𝐨 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐭𝐨 𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐚 𝐬𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐬𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐡 𝐨𝐟 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦 𝐰𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐛𝐞 𝐬𝐡𝐞𝐞𝐫 𝐠𝐮𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐛𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲. 𝐒𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐨𝐨𝐤𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐩𝐮𝐛𝐥𝐢𝐬𝐡𝐞𝐝 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐄𝐮𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐞𝐚𝐧 𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐰𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐧 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐲 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐢𝐭.

𝐈𝐭 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐛𝐞 𝐢𝐦𝐚𝐠𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐛𝐚𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰𝐥𝐞𝐝𝐠𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐨𝐧 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐤𝐬 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐲 𝐧𝐢𝐥, 𝐨𝐫 𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐚 𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐮𝐬 𝐪𝐮𝐚𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐭𝐲, 𝐫𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐮𝐛𝐣𝐞𝐜𝐭. 𝐈𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐚𝐬𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐦 𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐦 𝐨𝐟 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐡 𝐨𝐟 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐚𝐧 𝐨𝐮𝐭𝐥𝐨𝐨𝐤 𝐛𝐚𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐨𝐫𝐫𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐝 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐩𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐚𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐖𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐢𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐧𝐨 𝐯𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐚𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐦𝐮𝐬𝐭 𝐛𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐣𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐮𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭.

𝐒𝐮𝐛𝐬𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐚 𝐜𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐳𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐡𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐞𝐧𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐩𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡 𝐚 𝐭𝐞𝐦𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐚𝐫𝐲 𝐩𝐡𝐚𝐬𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐩𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐫 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐧𝐨 𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐜𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦. 𝐆𝐞𝐧𝐮𝐢𝐧𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐜𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐜𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐢𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐦𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐢𝐦𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐛𝐚𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐞 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐝𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐥 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐠𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐪𝐮𝐢𝐭𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠.

𝐓𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐚 𝐠𝐞𝐧𝐮𝐢𝐧𝐞 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐞𝐫, 𝐚 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐨𝐧 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐚 𝐛𝐮𝐫𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐭𝐡, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐨𝐯𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐇𝐢𝐬 𝐌𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐫, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐮𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐝𝐞𝐯𝐨𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐬 𝐰𝐞𝐥𝐥 𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐭𝐮𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦.


𝐌𝐌𝐕𝐈𝐈𝐈 © 𝐒𝐮𝐧𝐧𝐢𝐏𝐚𝐭𝐡.


𝐀𝐥𝐥 𝐫𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐞𝐝


𝐍𝐨 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐥𝐞 𝐦𝐚𝐲 𝐛𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐝𝐮𝐜𝐞𝐝, 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐲𝐞𝐝, 𝐦𝐨𝐝𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐞𝐝, 𝐨𝐫 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐛𝐮𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐩𝐫𝐢𝐨𝐫 𝐰𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐧 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐦𝐢𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐩𝐲𝐫𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐝𝐞𝐫. 𝐅𝐨𝐫 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐦𝐢𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐞 𝐬𝐮𝐛𝐦𝐢𝐭 𝐚 𝐫𝐞𝐪𝐮𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐚𝐭 𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐇𝐞𝐥𝐩𝐝𝐞𝐬𝐤.

The Sacred Hadith Project

Christian Missionaries on the Historical Method and Science of Hadith

Refuting The Argument That The Hadith Have Been Collected 200 Years After The Death Of The Prophet And Therefore Are  Unreliable

Hadith Preservation Response

Paul The False Apostle of Satan

Atheism