History of the Roman festival of Saturnalia Celebration, Sacrifice, & Influence on Christian Christmas

Saturnalia Roman festival

Saturnalia, the most popular of Roman festivals. Dedicated to the Roman god Saturn, the festival’s influence continues to be felt throughout the Western world.

Originally celebrated on December 17, Saturnalia was extended first to three and eventually to seven days. The date has been connected with the winter sowing season, which in modern Italy varies from October to January. Remarkably like the Greek Kronia, it was the liveliest festival of the year.

All work and business were suspended. Slaves were given temporary freedom to say and do what they liked, and certain moral restrictions were eased. The streets were infected with a Mardi Gras madness; a mock king was chosen (Saturnalicius princeps); the seasonal greeting of Saturnalia was heard everywhere.

The closing days of the Saturnalia were known as Sigillaria, because of the custom of making, toward the end of the festival, presents of candles, wax models of fruit, and waxen statuettes which were fashioned by the sigillarii or manufacturers of small figures in wax and other media.

 The cult statue of Saturn himself, traditionally bound at the feet with woolen bands, was untied, presumably to come out and join the fun.

Rome’s Awesome Pagan Christmas DOCUMENTARY

Attached Photo of Roman Forum: Temple of Saturn

The Temple of Saturn, with the Temple of Vespasian (also called Temple of Vespasian and Titus; right foreground), among the ruins of the Roman Forum, Rome.

The influence of the Saturnalia upon the celebrations of Christmas and the New Year has been direct. The fact that Christmas was celebrated on the birthday of the unconquered sun (dies solis invicti nati) gave the season a solar background, connected with the kalends of January (January 1, the Roman New Year) when houses were decorated with greenery and lights, and presents were given to children and the poor.

Concerning the gift candles, the Romans had a story that an old prophecy made the earliest inhabitants of Latium send heads to Hades and phota to Saturn.

The ancient Latins interpreted this to mean human sacrifices, but, according to legend, Hercules advised using lights (phos means “light” or “man” according to accent) and not human heads.

Reference:

https://www.britannica.com/topic/Saturnalia-Roman-festival

Rome’s Awesome Pagan Christmas DOCUMENTARY

Almighty Allah is the highest and most knowledgeable, and the attribution of knowledge to him is the safest.

Right from Almighty Allah and wrong from me and Satan

Prepared by Mohamad Mostafa Nassar- Australia.

www.IslamCompass.com 

Make sure to copy and email this post for your reference, you might need it later.

Arrogance is not only a sign of insecurity, but also a sign of immaturity. Mature and fully realised persons can get their points across, even emphatically without demeaning or intimidating others.