Can Christians And Jews Be Friends With Muslims? Quran (5:51)

𝐂𝐚𝐧 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐀𝐧𝐝 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬 𝐁𝐞 𝐅𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬 𝐖𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬? 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 (𝟓:𝟓𝟏)

Mohamad Mostafa Nassar
Twitter:@NassarMohamadMR

𝐂𝐚𝐧 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬 𝐛𝐞 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬? 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 𝐬𝐚𝐲𝐬,

“𝐎 𝐲𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞! 𝐭𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐚𝐰𝐥𝐢𝐲𝐚: 𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐚𝐰𝐥𝐢𝐲𝐚 𝐭𝐨 𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐡 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫. 𝐀𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐠𝐬𝐭 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐧𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦. 𝐕𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐥𝐲 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐠𝐮𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐭𝐡 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐚 𝐩𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐮𝐧𝐣𝐮𝐬𝐭.” – đđŽđŤđšđ§ 𝟓:𝟓𝟏

𝐑𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐥𝐞: “𝐒𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐡 𝟓:𝟓𝟏, 𝟑:𝟐𝟖, 𝟒:𝟏𝟒𝟒 𝐄𝐱𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐝“

𝐖𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐀𝐫𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐜 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐝 ‘𝐚𝐰𝐥𝐢𝐲𝐚’ 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐨 𝐄𝐧𝐠𝐥𝐢𝐬𝐡 𝐚𝐬 ‘𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬’ (𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 𝟓:𝟓𝟏), 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐜𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐥𝐲 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐭𝐰𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬, 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬. 𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐚𝐜𝐜𝐞𝐩𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞. 𝐁𝐮𝐭, 𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐧-𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐬𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐬 𝐟𝐚𝐯𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐀𝐫𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐜 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐝 ‘𝐚𝐰𝐥𝐢𝐲𝐚’ 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐛𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐦𝐞𝐚𝐧 ‘𝐠𝐮𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬’, ‘𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐬’, ‘𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐬’ 𝐚𝐧𝐝 ‘𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐬’, 𝐧𝐨𝐭 ‘𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬’, 𝐚𝐬 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐬𝐮𝐠𝐠𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐝.

𝐈𝐧 𝐚𝐝𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 𝟓:𝟓𝟏 𝐝𝐨𝐞𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐮𝐝𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬, 𝐢𝐭 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐚𝐝𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐫 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐲, 𝟏𝟒𝟎𝟎 𝐲𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐬 𝐚𝐠𝐨. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐜 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝟓:𝟓𝟏 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐦𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐫 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐛𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐫 𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡.

𝐓𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧:

𝐎 𝐲𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞! 𝐂𝐡𝐨𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐌𝐲 𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐦𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐦𝐲 𝐟𝐨𝐫 đšđĽđĽđ˘đžđŹ (𝐚𝐰𝐥𝐢𝐲𝐚) . 𝐃𝐨 𝐲𝐞 𝐠𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐩 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐭𝐡 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐡𝐚𝐭𝐡 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐮𝐧𝐭𝐨 𝐲𝐨𝐮, đđŤđ˘đŻđ˘đ§đ  𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐫 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐛𝐞𝐜𝐚𝐮𝐬𝐞 𝐲𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡, 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐋𝐨𝐫𝐝?

𝐈𝐟 𝐲𝐞 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐨 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐌𝐲 𝐰𝐚𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐞𝐞𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐌𝐲 𝐠𝐨𝐨𝐝 𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐮𝐫𝐞, (𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐰 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐩). 𝐃𝐨 𝐲𝐞 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐰 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐩 𝐮𝐧𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐢𝐧 𝐬𝐞𝐜𝐫𝐞𝐭, 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐈 𝐚𝐦 𝐁𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐀𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐲𝐞 𝐡𝐢𝐝𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐲𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐜𝐥𝐚𝐢𝐦? 𝐀𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐨𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐝𝐨𝐞𝐭𝐡 𝐢𝐭 𝐚𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐲𝐨𝐮, 𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐥𝐲 𝐡𝐚𝐭𝐡 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐲𝐞𝐝 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐲. – 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 𝟔𝟎:𝟏

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐪𝐮𝐨𝐭𝐞𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐧-𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐬𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐧 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 𝟓:𝟓𝟏. 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐟𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐨𝐫 𝐈𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐡𝐢𝐦 𝐊𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐧 𝐬𝐚𝐲𝐬,

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐝 𝐚𝐰𝐥𝐢𝐲𝐚 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐥𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐰𝐚𝐥𝐢, 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐢𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐦𝐨𝐬𝐭 𝐄𝐧𝐠𝐥𝐢𝐬𝐡 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐚𝐬 ‘𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝.’ 𝐀𝐜𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐝𝐬 𝐚𝐬, ‘𝐝𝐨 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐭𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐬 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬’. 𝐄𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐝 𝐰𝐚𝐥𝐢 𝐦𝐞𝐚𝐧 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐫𝐲 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐬𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐦, 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐱𝐭, 𝐢𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐞𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐟 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐨𝐫, 𝐥𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐥 𝐠𝐮𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐚𝐧, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲. 

𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐢𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐟𝐢𝐫𝐦𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐚𝐥-𝐓𝐚𝐛𝐚𝐫𝐢’𝐬 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝟓:𝟓𝟏 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐝𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐥𝐞𝐬 (𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐥𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐁𝐚𝐝𝐫 𝐢𝐧 𝟔𝟐𝟒 𝐨𝐫 𝐔𝐡𝐮𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝟔𝟐𝟓) 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐌𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐚 𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐚𝐠𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐞𝐜𝐜𝐚𝐧𝐬. 𝐔𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐢𝐫𝐜𝐮𝐦𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐚 𝐦𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐫𝐲 𝐜𝐚𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐢𝐠𝐧, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝐚𝐝𝐯𝐢𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐧𝐞𝐰 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦 𝐩𝐨𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐧𝐨𝐧-𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐢𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐯𝐢𝐨𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐦𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐚 𝐭𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐬𝐢𝐠𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦.

𝐈𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬, 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬 𝐨𝐫 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐰𝐡𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐬𝐨𝐜𝐢𝐨-𝐩𝐨𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐞𝐬. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐞𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐟 ‘𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲’ 𝐨𝐫 ‘𝐥𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐥 𝐠𝐮𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐚𝐧’ 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐰𝐚𝐥𝐢/𝐀𝐰𝐥𝐢𝐲𝐚 𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐞𝐬 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐬𝐞 𝐞𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐢𝐧 𝐯𝐢𝐞𝐰 𝐨𝐟 𝐈𝐛𝐧 𝐐𝐚𝐲𝐲𝐢𝐦’𝐬 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 ‘𝐰𝐡𝐨𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡 𝐚 𝐭𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭 [𝐚𝐡𝐝] 𝐢𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐢𝐧 𝐯𝐢𝐨𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐠𝐫𝐞𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭’. [𝟏]

𝐒𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐚𝐫 𝐌𝐮𝐡𝐚𝐦𝐦𝐚𝐝 𝐀𝐬𝐚𝐝

𝟕𝟐 𝐀𝐜𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐨 𝐦𝐨𝐬𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐬 (𝐞.𝐠., 𝐓𝐚𝐛𝐚𝐫𝐢), 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐦𝐞𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐡 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐭𝐰𝐨 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐞𝐱𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬 𝐠𝐞𝐧𝐮𝐢𝐧𝐞 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐩 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐚𝐝𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐬 – 𝐢.𝐞., 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 – 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐜𝐚𝐧𝐧𝐨𝐭, 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐞, 𝐛𝐞 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐨𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧. 𝐒𝐞𝐞 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝟖:𝟕𝟑, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐩𝐨𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐞𝐬.

𝟕𝟑 𝐋𝐢𝐭., ‘𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐯𝐢𝐥𝐝𝐨𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐟𝐨𝐥𝐤’: 𝐢.𝐞., 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐝𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐛𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐥𝐲 𝐬𝐢𝐧 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐭. 𝐀𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐞𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 ‘𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞’ 𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞, 𝐬𝐞𝐞 𝟑:𝟐𝟖, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝟒:𝟏𝟑𝟗 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐩𝐨𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐞, 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐚 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫’𝐬 𝐥𝐨𝐬𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐢𝐟 𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐦𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐚𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐞 𝐨𝐟, 𝐨𝐫 – 𝐢𝐧 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐜 𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐲 – ‘𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐡𝐢𝐦𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐟’ 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡, 𝐧𝐨𝐧-𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬. 

𝐇𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫, 𝐚𝐬 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐦𝐚𝐝𝐞 𝐚𝐛𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐚𝐧𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐜𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐫 𝐢𝐧 𝟔𝟎:𝟕-𝟗 (𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝟓𝟕 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐒𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐡), 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐡𝐢𝐛𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐚 ‘𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞’ 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐧𝐨𝐧-𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐝𝐨𝐞𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐭𝐮𝐭𝐞 𝐚𝐧 𝐢𝐧𝐣𝐮𝐧𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐠𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐥, 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐥𝐲 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐰𝐞𝐥𝐥-𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐬 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬. 𝐈𝐭 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐛𝐞 𝐛𝐨𝐫𝐧𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐦 𝐰𝐚𝐥𝐢 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐬𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐬𝐡𝐚𝐝𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐦𝐞𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠: ‘𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲’, ‘𝐡𝐞𝐥𝐩𝐞𝐫’, ‘𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐨𝐫’, 𝐞𝐭𝐜. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐢𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐫 𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐦 – 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞𝐬 𝐚 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐛𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐰𝐨 𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐦𝐬 – 𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐰𝐚𝐲𝐬 𝐝𝐞𝐩𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐱𝐭. [𝟐]

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐨𝐥𝐲 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐀𝐫𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐜 𝐭𝐞𝐱𝐭 𝐖𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐄𝐧𝐠𝐥𝐢𝐬𝐡 𝐓𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 & 𝐒𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐭 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐫𝐲 – 𝐌𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐤 𝐆𝐡𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐦 𝐅𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐝

𝟕𝟓𝟔. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐛𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐡𝐢𝐛𝐢𝐭 𝐨𝐫 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐜𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝐣𝐮𝐬𝐭 𝐨𝐫 𝐛𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐯𝐨𝐥𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐭𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬, 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬 (𝟔𝟎:𝟗). đˆđ­ 𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬 𝐨𝐫 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐫 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐥𝐰𝐚𝐲𝐬 𝐡𝐚𝐭𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐩𝐥𝐨𝐭𝐬 𝐚𝐠𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦.

𝟕𝟓𝟕. 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐠𝐞𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐝𝐢𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐛𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐨𝐩𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦. 𝐓𝐫𝐮𝐥𝐲, 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐨𝐥𝐲 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐬𝐚𝐢𝐝, ‘𝐀𝐥𝐥 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐟 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐬 𝐨𝐧 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐲’, 𝐯𝐢𝐳., 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬, 𝐡𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐢𝐧𝐢𝐦𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐭𝐨 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫, 𝐛𝐞𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐥𝐢𝐤𝐞 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐨𝐩𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬. [𝟑]

𝐌𝐚𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐚 𝐌𝐮𝐡𝐚𝐦𝐦𝐚𝐝 𝐀𝐥𝐢

𝟓𝟏𝐚. 𝐀𝐥𝐥 𝐧𝐨𝐧-𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬, 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐝𝐢𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐬, 𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐦𝐚𝐝𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐨𝐧 𝐜𝐚𝐮𝐬𝐞 𝐚𝐠𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦; 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐦𝐞𝐚𝐧𝐭 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐛𝐞𝐢𝐧𝐠 ‘𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐡 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫’. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐡𝐞𝐥𝐩 𝐨𝐫 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐩 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦, 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬, 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐫 𝐢𝐝𝐨𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐬.

𝐈𝐭 𝐰𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐰𝐞𝐚𝐤𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐮𝐥𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐮𝐦𝐩𝐡 𝐨𝐟 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦 𝐢𝐟, 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐟𝐞𝐚𝐫 𝐨𝐟 𝐚 𝐩𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐟𝐮𝐥 𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐦𝐲, 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐬𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐡𝐞𝐥𝐩 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐩 𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐚 𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐥𝐞 𝐩𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞, 𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐧𝐞𝐱𝐭 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐰𝐬. 𝐖𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐰𝐨 𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐫, 𝐚𝐧 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐮𝐚𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐥𝐲 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐦𝐲 𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐧 𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐦𝐲; 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐞𝐱𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐬𝐚𝐲𝐬 𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞. [𝟒]

‘𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐢𝐬𝐡 𝐓𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐭: 𝐀𝐧 𝐈𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐝𝐮𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 – 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐟𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐨𝐫 𝐎𝐥𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐋𝐞𝐚𝐦𝐚𝐧

𝐂𝐀𝐍 𝐌𝐔𝐒𝐋𝐈𝐌𝐒 𝐀𝐍𝐃 𝐉𝐄𝐖𝐒 𝐁𝐄 𝐅𝐑𝐈𝐄𝐍𝐃𝐒?

𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐬𝐮𝐠𝐠𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐚 𝐧𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐰𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐪𝐮𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐢𝐫𝐬𝐭 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝟓. 𝟓𝟏 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐚𝐲𝐬, ‘𝐎, 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞, 𝐝𝐨 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐭𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐰𝐥𝐢𝐲𝐚. 𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐰𝐥𝐢𝐲𝐚 𝐭𝐨 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐧𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦. 𝐓𝐫𝐮𝐥𝐲, 𝐆𝐨𝐝 𝐝𝐨𝐞𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐠𝐮𝐢𝐝𝐞 𝐰𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐠𝐝𝐨𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐩𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞’ (𝟓.𝟓𝟏). 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐝 𝐚𝐰𝐥𝐢𝐲𝐚 (𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠. 𝐖𝐚𝐥𝐢) 𝐢𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐬 ‘𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬’.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐚 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐲 𝐜𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐫 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐨𝐩𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐥𝐲 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐭𝐰𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬, 𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐡𝐚𝐧𝐝, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬, 𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫. 𝐇𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫, 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐥𝐞 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐞𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐚𝐰𝐥𝐢𝐲𝐚 𝐢𝐬 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬, 𝐢𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐦𝐞𝐚𝐧𝐬 ‘𝐠𝐮𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬’ 𝐚𝐧𝐝 ‘𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐬’.

𝐀𝐜𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐨 𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐰𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐨𝐥𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐭 𝐚 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐝𝐢𝐟𝐟𝐢𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐭 𝐦𝐨𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐲, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐫𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐝𝐞𝐬𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐛𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐢𝐭𝐮𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐀𝐫𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐚 𝐭𝐨 𝐩𝐮𝐭 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝟓.𝟓𝟏 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐱𝐭. 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐜 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐬 𝐝𝐨 𝐧𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐤 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐫 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐱𝐭 𝐢𝐧 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐞𝐝, 𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐠𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐚 𝐠𝐮𝐢𝐝𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐡𝐨𝐰 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐛𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐭𝐞𝐝.

𝐁𝐞𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝟓.𝟓𝟏 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐞𝐝, 𝐌𝐮𝐡𝐚𝐦𝐦𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐣𝐮𝐬𝐭 𝐦𝐢𝐠𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐬 𝐚 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐌𝐞𝐜𝐜𝐚 𝐭𝐨 𝐌𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐡. 𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐝𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐬𝐨, 𝐚𝐜𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐜 𝐚𝐜𝐜𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐭, 𝐛𝐞𝐜𝐚𝐮𝐬𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞𝐜𝐮𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐬𝐮𝐛𝐣𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐚𝐧𝐝𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐟𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰 𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐛𝐞𝐬𝐦𝐞𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐌𝐞𝐜𝐜𝐚.

𝐌𝐨𝐬𝐭 𝐌𝐞𝐜𝐜𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐩𝐩𝐞𝐝 𝐯𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐢𝐝𝐨𝐥𝐬 𝐚𝐬 𝐠𝐨𝐝𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐫𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐭 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐰𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐡𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐝𝐨𝐥 𝐛𝐮𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐠𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐌𝐮𝐡𝐚𝐦𝐦𝐞𝐝 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐢𝐭𝐲, 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡 𝐌𝐮𝐡𝐚𝐦𝐦𝐞𝐝 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐡𝐢𝐦𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐟 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐌𝐞𝐜𝐜𝐚. 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐫𝐮𝐩𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐨𝐦𝐢𝐜 𝐛𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐟𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐚𝐧𝐧𝐮𝐚𝐥 𝐩𝐢𝐥𝐠𝐫𝐢𝐦𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝐬𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐨𝐧 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐩𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐀𝐫𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐚𝐧 𝐏𝐞𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐮𝐥𝐚 𝐰𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐩 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐚𝐲 𝐢𝐝𝐨𝐥𝐬 𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐊𝐚’𝐛𝐚- 𝐚 𝐜𝐮𝐛𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐜𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐞

𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐜𝐥𝐚𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐠𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐛𝐮𝐢𝐥𝐭 𝐛𝐲 𝐀𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐡𝐚𝐦 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐬𝐨𝐧, 𝐈𝐬𝐡𝐦𝐚𝐞𝐥, 𝐚𝐬 𝐚 𝐭𝐞𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐆𝐨𝐝, 𝐛𝐞𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐫𝐮𝐩𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐢𝐧 𝐀𝐫𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐚 𝐡𝐢𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐬𝐭 𝐦𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐡𝐚𝐦 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐜𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐨𝐫𝐬. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐨𝐭𝐭𝐨𝐦 𝐟𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐝𝐨𝐥 𝐛𝐮𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐡𝐮𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐦𝐚𝐝𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐥𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐢𝐧 𝐢𝐭, 𝐬𝐨 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐡𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐥𝐲 𝐬𝐮𝐫𝐩𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐌𝐮𝐡𝐚𝐦𝐦𝐞𝐝 𝐟𝐚𝐜𝐞𝐝 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐠𝐢𝐧𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠.

𝐌𝐮𝐡𝐚𝐦𝐦𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐬𝐦𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐛𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐟𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐮𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐌𝐞𝐜𝐜𝐚 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐭𝐮𝐚𝐫𝐲 𝐢𝐧 𝐌𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐡. 𝐀𝐜𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐬, 𝐢𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐥𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐟𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐦𝐢𝐠𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐌𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝟓.𝟓𝟏 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐞𝐝. 𝐒𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲, 𝐰𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐨𝐥𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝐜𝐚𝐦𝐞 𝐝𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐚𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐥𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐁𝐚𝐝𝐫 (𝟑.𝟏𝟐𝟑) 𝐨𝐫 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐡𝐚𝐩𝐬 𝐚𝐟𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐥𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐔𝐡𝐮𝐝 (𝟑.𝟏𝟓𝟐-𝟑).

𝐈𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐝𝐚𝐲𝐬, 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐮𝐞𝐝 𝐧𝐨 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐧 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐡𝐚𝐩𝐬 𝐚 𝐟𝐞𝐰 𝐡𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐩𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐚𝐥𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐝𝐲 𝐌𝐞𝐜𝐜𝐚, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐞𝐜𝐜𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐮𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐧𝐠𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐦𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐥𝐲, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐭𝐰𝐨 𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐛𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐥𝐞𝐬, 𝐚𝐬 𝐰𝐞𝐥𝐥 𝐚𝐬 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐬, 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐜𝐫𝐮𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐜 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐲.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐞𝐜𝐜𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐚 𝐟𝐚𝐫 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐩𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐟𝐮𝐥 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐜𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐚𝐝𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐞𝐜𝐜𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐀𝐫𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐚. 𝐆𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐦𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐧𝐮𝐦𝐛𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐟𝐥𝐞𝐝𝐠𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐟𝐚𝐜𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐥 𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐛𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐮𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐚𝐧𝐧𝐢𝐡𝐢𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐥𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐟𝐥𝐢𝐜𝐭𝐬.𝐖𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐡𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐥𝐲 𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐫𝐠𝐞𝐝 𝐞𝐧𝐯𝐢𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐦𝐞𝐦𝐛𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐰𝐚𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐮𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐧𝐨𝐧-𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐛𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐠𝐢𝐨𝐧.

𝐖𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐌𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐡, 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐢𝐬𝐡 𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐛𝐞𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐭𝐮𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐚 𝐩𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐟𝐮𝐥 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐧 𝐠𝐨𝐨𝐝 𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐦𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐌𝐞𝐜𝐜𝐚𝐧𝐬, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐡 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐧𝐮𝐦𝐞𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧 𝐀𝐫𝐚𝐛 𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐛𝐞𝐬. 𝐒𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐢𝐭 𝐰𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐛𝐞 𝐚 𝐠𝐨𝐨𝐝 𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐚 𝐭𝐨 𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐨𝐫 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐠𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐩𝐬 𝐚𝐬 𝐚 𝐰𝐚𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐯𝐞𝐬 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐞𝐜𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐚𝐫𝐦𝐢𝐞𝐬’ 𝐮𝐥𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐮𝐦𝐩𝐡.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐢𝐞𝐰 𝐦𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐚 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐠 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐲, 𝐢𝐧 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐝𝐢𝐫𝐞 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐭𝐬, 𝐜𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐤𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐟𝐮𝐥 𝐚𝐬 𝐰𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐛𝐞 𝐜𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐯𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐮𝐚𝐥𝐬 𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐯𝐞𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐧𝐨𝐧-𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐜 𝐠𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐩𝐬. đ’𝐨 𝐰𝐞 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐬𝐞𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐚𝐰𝐥𝐢𝐲𝐚 𝐚𝐬 ‘𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬’ 𝐢𝐬 𝐦𝐢𝐬𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐭 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐛𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐡𝐚𝐩𝐬 𝐚𝐬 ‘𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐬’ 𝐨𝐫 ‘𝐠𝐮𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬’ 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐜𝐭 𝐦𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐫𝐲 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐬𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐦𝐬. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐛𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐝 𝐚𝐬,

‘𝐃𝐨 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐭𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬 𝐚𝐬 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐬. 𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫.’

𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐫𝐢𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐈𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐢𝐬 𝐬𝐮𝐩𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐱𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐛𝐲 đ­đĄđž 𝐟𝐚𝐜𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐝𝐨𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐨𝐩𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐬𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐭𝐰𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐩𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐬, 𝐚𝐬 𝐢𝐬 𝐜𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐫 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐜 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞𝐬. [𝟓]

𝐒𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐚𝐫 𝐉𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐧 𝐀. 𝐂. 𝐁𝐫𝐨𝐰𝐧:

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐝 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐦𝐢𝐬𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐭𝐨𝐨𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐦𝐨𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐧 𝐜𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐪𝐮𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐀𝐫𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐜… 𝐚𝐬 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬 (𝐚𝐰𝐥𝐢𝐲𝐚) 𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐮𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐦𝐞𝐚𝐧𝐭 ‘𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐬’ 𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐰𝐡𝐨𝐦 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐢𝐭𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭, 𝐞𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐚𝐬 𝐚 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐨𝐫 𝐨𝐫 𝐚 𝐬𝐮𝐛𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐞. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐮𝐬 𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐧𝐬 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐚𝐠𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭 𝐭𝐚𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐢𝐝𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐮𝐧𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐚𝐠𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭 𝐟𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐟𝐥𝐢𝐜𝐭𝐬, 𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐠𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐩𝐬 ‘𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐯𝐞𝐬’, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬. [𝟔]

𝐌𝐮𝐟𝐭𝐢 𝐃𝐫. 𝐌𝐮𝐳𝐚𝐦𝐦𝐢𝐥 𝐒𝐢𝐝𝐝𝐢𝐪𝐢 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐞𝐫 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐜 𝐒𝐨𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐭𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐍𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐡 𝐀𝐦𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐜𝐚, 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐢𝐧𝐠:

“… 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐝𝐨𝐞𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐬𝐚𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐧-𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐜𝐚𝐧𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐛𝐞 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬’ 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬, đ§đ¨đŤ 𝐝𝐨𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐭 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐛𝐢𝐝 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐧𝐨𝐧-𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬. 𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐧𝐨𝐧-𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐠𝐨𝐨𝐝 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐮𝐚𝐥𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐲. 𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐠𝐨𝐨𝐝 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐲 𝐨𝐛𝐬𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐲 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐧𝐨𝐧-𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐚𝐦𝐞 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞.

𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦 𝐭𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐡𝐞𝐬 𝐮𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐰𝐞 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐛𝐞 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐩𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞. 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦 𝐭𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐡𝐞𝐬 𝐮𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐰𝐞 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐝𝐞𝐚𝐥 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐦𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐣𝐮𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐫𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐬. 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐬𝐚𝐲𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐠𝐢𝐧𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐚𝐦𝐞 𝐒𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐭 𝐀𝐥-𝐌𝐚’𝐝𝐚𝐡: [𝐎 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞! 𝐒𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐟𝐢𝐫𝐦𝐥𝐲 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐚𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐫 𝐝𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐥𝐞𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐬𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐰𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐝𝐞𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐣𝐮𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐞. 𝐁𝐞 𝐣𝐮𝐬𝐭, 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐞𝐱𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐩𝐢𝐞𝐭𝐲. 𝐅𝐞𝐚𝐫 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡, 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐝 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐢𝐬 𝐰𝐞𝐥𝐥-𝐚𝐜𝐪𝐮𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐝𝐨.] (𝐀𝐥-𝐌𝐚’𝐝𝐚𝐡 𝟓 :𝟖)

𝐈𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐜𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧, 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐀𝐥𝐦𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭𝐲 𝐬𝐚𝐲𝐬:

[𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐛𝐢𝐝𝐬 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐫𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐫𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐟𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐭𝐡, 𝐧𝐨𝐫 𝐝𝐫𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐡𝐨𝐦𝐞𝐬, 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐝𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐣𝐮𝐬𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦. 𝐅𝐨𝐫 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐥𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐣𝐮𝐬𝐭. 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐛𝐢𝐝𝐬 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐫𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐫𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐟𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐭𝐡, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐝𝐫𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐡𝐨𝐦𝐞𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐮𝐩𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐝𝐫𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐨𝐮𝐭, 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 (𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐚𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐚𝐬 𝐰𝐚𝐥𝐢). 𝐓𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐬𝐞𝐞𝐤 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐝 𝐰𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐠- 𝐝𝐨𝐞𝐫𝐬.] (𝐀𝐥-𝐌𝐮𝐦𝐭𝐚𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐡 𝟔𝟎: 𝟖-𝟗)

𝐌𝐨𝐫𝐞𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫, 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐀𝐥𝐦𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭𝐲 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐝𝐞𝐬𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐛𝐞𝐝 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐌𝐮𝐡𝐚𝐦𝐦𝐚𝐝 (𝐩𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐛𝐥𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬 𝐛𝐞 𝐮𝐩𝐨𝐧 𝐡𝐢𝐦) 𝐚𝐬 “𝐚 𝐦𝐞𝐫𝐜𝐲” 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐥𝐝𝐬. 𝐇𝐞 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐚 𝐬𝐢𝐠𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡’𝐬 𝐌𝐞𝐫𝐜𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐚𝐥𝐥, 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐚𝐬 𝐰𝐞𝐥𝐥 𝐚𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐧-𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬. 𝐈𝐧 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐫 𝐭𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐡𝐞 𝐝𝐢𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐝𝐢𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐭𝐰𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐧-𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬. 𝐇𝐞 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐚𝐠𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐌𝐚𝐤𝐤𝐚𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐡𝐢𝐦. 𝐇𝐞 𝐦𝐚𝐝𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐌𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐨𝐧𝐨𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐮𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐥 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐛𝐫𝐨𝐤𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦.

𝐇𝐞 (𝐩𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐛𝐥𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬 𝐛𝐞 𝐮𝐩𝐨𝐧 𝐡𝐢𝐦) 𝐢𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐍𝐚𝐣𝐫𝐚𝐧 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐌𝐚𝐬𝐣𝐢𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐌𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐡. 𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐚𝐫𝐠𝐮𝐞𝐝 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐡𝐢𝐦 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦, 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐡𝐨𝐧𝐨𝐫 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐭. 𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐞𝐱𝐚𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐬 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐰 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐩𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞.

𝐈𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐪𝐮𝐨𝐭𝐞𝐝, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐝 “𝐀𝐰𝐥𝐢𝐲𝐚” 𝐢𝐬 𝐮𝐬𝐞𝐝. 𝐈𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐚 𝐩𝐥𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐫 𝐢𝐬 “𝐰𝐚𝐥𝐢”. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐝 “”𝐰𝐚𝐥𝐢”” 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 “𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝” 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐢𝐬 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐲 𝐜𝐥𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐞. 𝐈𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐮𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐦𝐞𝐚𝐧 “𝐠𝐮𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐚𝐧, 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐨𝐫, 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐧, 𝐥𝐨𝐫𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐦𝐚𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐫“.

𝐈𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐝 𝐢𝐬 𝐮𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐆𝐨𝐝, 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐚𝐬 [𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐨𝐫 (𝐨𝐫 𝐋𝐨𝐫𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐌𝐚𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐫) 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞. 𝐇𝐞 𝐭𝐚𝐤𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐝𝐞𝐩𝐭𝐡𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐝𝐚𝐫𝐤𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭…] (𝐀𝐥- 𝐁𝐚𝐪𝐚𝐫𝐚𝐡 𝟐: 𝟐𝟓𝟕)

𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐠𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐦𝐞𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐚𝐦𝐞 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐝 𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞𝐬 𝐮𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐡𝐮𝐦𝐚𝐧 𝐛𝐞𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬, 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐚𝐬 [𝐀𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐨𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐢𝐬 𝐤𝐢𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐮𝐧𝐣𝐮𝐬𝐭𝐥𝐲, 𝐖𝐞 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐠𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐞𝐱𝐭 𝐤𝐢𝐧 “𝐰𝐚𝐥𝐢” 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐮𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐲 (𝐭𝐨 𝐬𝐞𝐞𝐤 𝐣𝐮𝐝𝐠𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐨𝐫 𝐩𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐬𝐡𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐜𝐚𝐬𝐞)…] (𝐀𝐥-‘𝐈𝐬𝐫𝐚’ 𝟏𝟕 :𝟑𝟑)

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐒𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐭 𝐀𝐥-𝐌𝐚’𝐢𝐝𝐚𝐡 𝐢𝐬: [𝐎 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞! 𝐃𝐨 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐭𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐬 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐬. 𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐩𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞. 𝐇𝐞 𝐚𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐰𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦. 𝐕𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐥𝐲 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐠𝐮𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐚 𝐩𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐮𝐧𝐣𝐮𝐬𝐭.] (𝐀𝐥-𝐌𝐚’𝐝𝐚𝐡 𝟓: 𝟓𝟏)

𝐈𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐛𝐯𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐢𝐳𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐢𝐳𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬, 𝐬𝐨 𝐰𝐡𝐲 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐢𝐳𝐞 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐮𝐩𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐩𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞. 𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐭𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐮𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐚𝐠𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬 𝐨𝐫 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬, 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐮𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐰𝐞 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐭𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐜𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐩𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐞 𝐦𝐮𝐬𝐭 𝐬𝐮𝐩𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭 𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐡 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫.

𝐈𝐧 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐓𝐚𝐟𝐬𝐢𝐫, (𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐞𝐱𝐞𝐠𝐞𝐬𝐢𝐬) 𝐈𝐦𝐚𝐦 𝐈𝐛𝐧 𝐊𝐚𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐫 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐬𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐬 𝐬𝐚𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞 (𝐢.𝐞. 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨) 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐟𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐁𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐥𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐔𝐡𝐮𝐝 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐚 𝐬𝐞𝐭 𝐛𝐚𝐜𝐤. 𝐀𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞, 𝐚 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐌𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐡 𝐬𝐚𝐢𝐝,

“𝐈 𝐚𝐦 𝐠𝐨𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐨 𝐥𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬 𝐬𝐨 𝐈 𝐬𝐡𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐛𝐞 𝐬𝐚𝐟𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐜𝐚𝐬𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐚𝐜𝐤 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐧 𝐌𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐡.” 𝐀𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐨𝐧 𝐬𝐚𝐢𝐝, “𝐈 𝐚𝐦 𝐠𝐨𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐨 𝐥𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐬𝐨 𝐈 𝐬𝐡𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐛𝐞 𝐬𝐚𝐟𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐜𝐚𝐬𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐚𝐜𝐤 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐧 𝐌𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐡.” 𝐒𝐨 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐬𝐞𝐞𝐤 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐬, 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐡 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫. (𝐒𝐞𝐞 𝐈𝐛𝐧 𝐊𝐚𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐫, 𝐀𝐥-𝐓𝐚𝐟𝐬𝐢𝐫, 𝐯𝐨𝐥. 𝟐, 𝐩. 𝟔𝟖)

𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐧-𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐚𝐬 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬 𝐚𝐬 𝐥𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐤𝐞𝐞𝐩 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐢𝐭𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦 𝐩𝐮𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐠. 𝐘𝐨𝐮 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐢𝐧 𝐩𝐨𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐚 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐦𝐚𝐧 𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐦𝐚𝐫𝐫𝐲 𝐚 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐢𝐬𝐡 𝐨𝐫 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧 𝐰𝐨𝐦𝐚𝐧. 𝐈𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐛𝐯𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐦𝐚𝐫𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐥𝐨𝐯𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐩. 𝐈𝐟 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐩 𝐛𝐞𝐭𝐰𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬 𝐨𝐫 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐛𝐢𝐝𝐝𝐞𝐧, 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐰𝐡𝐲 𝐰𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦 𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰 𝐚 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐦𝐚𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐦𝐚𝐫𝐫𝐲 𝐚 𝐉𝐞𝐰 𝐨𝐫 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧 𝐰𝐨𝐦𝐚𝐧?

𝐈𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐝𝐮𝐭𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐢𝐳𝐞 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬. 𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐢𝐳𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐠𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐨𝐫 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐟𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐭𝐡, 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐢𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐟𝐚𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐛𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐬. 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐬𝐚𝐲𝐬: [𝐎 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞! 𝐓𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐬 (𝐚𝐰𝐥𝐢𝐲𝐚’) 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐟𝐚𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐛𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐢𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐥𝐨𝐯𝐞 𝐮𝐧𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐟 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐯𝐞 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐭𝐡. 𝐈𝐟 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐝𝐨 𝐬𝐨, 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐝 𝐰𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐠-𝐝𝐨𝐞𝐫𝐬.] (𝐀𝐥-𝐓𝐚𝐰𝐛𝐚𝐡 𝟗: 𝟐𝟑)

𝐈𝐧 𝐚 𝐬𝐢𝐦𝐢𝐥𝐚𝐫 𝐰𝐚𝐲, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐭𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐬 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐧𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐢𝐳𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐧-𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐚𝐠𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬. 𝐇𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫, 𝐢𝐟 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐝𝐨 𝐰𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐨 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐧-𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬, 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬’𝐬 𝐝𝐮𝐭𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐡𝐞𝐥𝐩 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐧-𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐨𝐩𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 (𝐩𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐛𝐥𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬 𝐛𝐞 𝐮𝐩𝐨𝐧 𝐡𝐢𝐦) 𝐬𝐚𝐢𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐢𝐦𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐟 𝐰𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐝𝐞𝐟𝐞𝐧𝐝 𝐚 𝐃𝐡𝐢𝐦𝐦𝐢 𝐥𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐰𝐡𝐨𝐦 𝐢𝐧𝐣𝐮𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐞 𝐢𝐬 𝐝𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐛𝐲 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬. 𝐁𝐮𝐭 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐭𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐡𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐬𝐞𝐞𝐤 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐧𝐨𝐧-𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐚𝐠𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬. 𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐭𝐫𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐬𝐨𝐥𝐯𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐛𝐥𝐞𝐦𝐬 𝐚𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐯𝐞𝐬. 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐀𝐥𝐦𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭𝐲 𝐬𝐚𝐲𝐬, [𝐋𝐞𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐁𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐭𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐮𝐧𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐚𝐠𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐁𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬…] (𝐀𝐚𝐥-‘𝐈𝐦𝐫𝐚𝐧 𝟑: 𝟐𝟖)

𝐇𝐞 𝐀𝐥𝐦𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭𝐲 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐬𝐚𝐲𝐬: [𝐎 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞! 𝐓𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐮𝐧𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐧 𝐁𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬. 𝐃𝐨 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐰𝐢𝐬𝐡 𝐭𝐨 𝐨𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐫 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐚𝐧 𝐨𝐩𝐞𝐧 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐨𝐟 𝐚𝐠𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐯𝐞𝐬?] (𝐀𝐧-𝐍𝐢𝐬𝐚𝐚’ 𝟒:𝟏𝟒𝟒) …” (𝐅𝐚𝐭𝐰𝐚 – 𝐃𝐨𝐞𝐬 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦 𝐅𝐨𝐫𝐛𝐢𝐝 𝐁𝐞𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐍𝐨𝐧-𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬? 𝐛𝐲 𝐌𝐮𝐟𝐭𝐢 𝐌𝐮𝐳𝐚𝐦𝐦𝐢𝐥 𝐒𝐢𝐝𝐝𝐢𝐪𝐢, đ¨đ§đĽđ˘đ§đž 𝐬𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐜𝐞)

𝐀𝐬𝐬𝐨𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐟𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐨𝐫 𝐨𝐟 𝐑𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐒𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐢𝐞𝐬 đ‰đ¨đĄđ§ 𝐊𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐧𝐞𝐫 đŹđšđ˛đŹ 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐨 “𝐦𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭” 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬:

“…𝟓:𝟓𝟏: ‘𝐎𝐡 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬, 𝐝𝐨 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐭𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐬. 𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫. 𝐀𝐧𝐲𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐭𝐚𝐤𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦. 𝐆𝐨𝐝 𝐝𝐨𝐞𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐠𝐮𝐢𝐝𝐞 𝐚𝐧 𝐮𝐧𝐣𝐮𝐬𝐭 𝐩𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞.’

𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐜𝐢𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐬𝐮𝐩𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐠𝐮𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐭𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐡𝐞𝐬 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐚𝐯𝐨𝐢𝐝 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐜𝐨𝐬𝐭𝐬. 𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐢𝐬 𝐛𝐚𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐧 𝐚 𝐦𝐢𝐬𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐀𝐫𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐜 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐝 ‘𝐚𝐰𝐥𝐢𝐲𝐚’ (𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠. 𝐖𝐚𝐥𝐢), 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐬 ‘𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐬.’ 𝐒𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐬𝐚𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐝 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐛𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 ‘𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬,’ 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐜𝐥𝐚𝐢𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐡𝐢𝐛𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐚𝐥, 𝐜𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐥 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐭𝐰𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬.

𝐈𝐧 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐫 𝐨𝐫 𝐩𝐥𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐝 𝐰𝐚𝐥𝐢 𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐦𝐨𝐬𝐭 𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐭𝐲 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐚 𝐰𝐢𝐝𝐞 𝐬𝐞𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐜 𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐠𝐞. 𝐀𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐦𝐞𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐞 ‘𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲,’ ‘𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝,’ ‘𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐨𝐫,’ ‘𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐧.’ ‘𝐟𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐫,’ 𝐚𝐧𝐝 ‘𝐥𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐥 𝐠𝐮𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐚𝐧.’

𝐄𝐚𝐜𝐡 𝐮𝐬𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐝 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐭𝐨𝐨𝐝 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐪𝐮𝐞 𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐫𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐱𝐭𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐨 𝐝𝐞𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐦𝐞𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐢𝐬 𝐦𝐨𝐬𝐭 𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐫𝐢𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐞𝐱𝐭. 𝐈𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐜𝐚𝐬𝐞, 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐚 𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐩𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐧 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐨𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐚 𝐬𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 (𝟓:𝟓𝟏-𝟔𝟎) 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐝𝐞𝐬𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐛𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 đŒđˆđ’đ“đ‘đ„đ€đ“đŒđ„đđ“ 𝐀𝐍𝐃 𝐋𝐀𝐂𝐊 𝐎𝐅 𝐑𝐄𝐒𝐏𝐄𝐂𝐓 𝐌𝐔𝐒𝐋𝐈𝐌𝐒 𝐖𝐄𝐑𝐄 𝐄𝐗𝐏𝐄𝐑𝐈𝐄𝐍𝐂𝐈𝐍𝐆 𝐅𝐑𝐎𝐌 𝐉𝐄𝐖𝐒, 𝐂𝐇𝐑𝐈𝐒𝐓𝐈𝐀𝐍𝐒, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐬.

𝐈𝐭 𝐢𝐬 đ­đĄđžđŤđžđŸđ¨đŤđž 𝐮𝐫𝐠𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐜𝐚𝐮𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐰𝐡𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐭𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐬 đ¨đŤ 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 đˆđ’ 𝐍𝐎𝐓 𝐌𝐀𝐊𝐈𝐍𝐆 𝐀 𝐁𝐋𝐀𝐍𝐊𝐄𝐓 𝐒𝐓𝐀𝐓𝐄𝐌𝐄𝐍𝐓 𝐀𝐁𝐎𝐔𝐓 𝐀𝐕𝐎𝐈𝐃𝐈𝐍𝐆 𝐀𝐋𝐋 𝐂𝐎𝐍𝐓𝐀𝐂𝐓 đ°đ˘đ­đĄ 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬. 𝐆𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐜𝐢𝐫𝐜𝐮𝐦𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐬, 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐨𝐥𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐨𝐠𝐞𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐧 𝐨𝐧 𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐡 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐮𝐩𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭.

𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐩𝐨𝐢𝐧𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐜𝐞𝐝 𝐚 𝐟𝐞𝐰 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐫, 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐭𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐬 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐝. ‘𝐘𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐬 [𝐰𝐚𝐥𝐢] 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐆𝐨𝐝, 𝐇𝐢𝐬 𝐌𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐫, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬 – 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐞𝐧𝐠𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐩𝐫𝐚𝐲𝐞𝐫, 𝐩𝐚𝐲 𝐚𝐥𝐦𝐬, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐛𝐨𝐰 𝐝𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐢𝐧 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐩’ (𝟓:𝟓𝟓; 𝐜𝐟. 𝟔:𝟏𝟒).” (𝐈𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐝𝐮𝐜𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧: 𝐅𝐨𝐫 𝐓𝐨𝐝𝐚𝐲’𝐬 𝐑𝐞𝐚𝐝𝐞𝐫 [𝐅𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐏𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐬, 𝐌𝐢𝐧𝐧𝐞𝐚𝐩𝐨𝐥𝐢𝐬, 𝟐𝟎𝟏𝟏] 𝐛𝐲 𝐉𝐨𝐡𝐧 𝐊𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐧𝐞𝐫, 𝐩𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝟏𝟒𝟕)

𝐒𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐡 𝟓:𝟓𝟏 𝐚𝐜𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐨 𝐜𝐥𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐬𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐚𝐫 𝐈𝐛𝐧 𝐊𝐚𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐫 (𝟏𝟑𝟎𝟏 – 𝟏𝟑𝟕𝟑 𝐀𝐃), 𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐧𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐮𝐥𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐥𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬. 𝐇𝐢𝐬 𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐛𝐢𝐝𝐝𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐩𝐞𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐥𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐮𝐥𝐭 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 đŤđžđĽđ˘đ đ˘đ¨đ§:

“𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐡𝐢𝐛𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐁𝐞𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐊𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐨𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐬 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐛𝐚𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐭 𝐃𝐢𝐬𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬

‘𝐈𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐚𝐠𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐜𝐜𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐝𝐫𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐡𝐨𝐦𝐞𝐬, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐞𝐥𝐩𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐝𝐫𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐛𝐢𝐝𝐬 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦.’ (𝟔𝟎:𝟗) 𝐦𝐞𝐚𝐧𝐬, `𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐛𝐢𝐝𝐬 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐛𝐞𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐛𝐞𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐚𝐫𝐞 đŽđđ„đđ‹đ˜ 𝐇𝐎𝐒𝐓𝐈𝐋𝐄 𝐓𝐎 𝐘𝐎𝐔, 𝐓𝐇𝐎𝐒𝐄 𝐖𝐇𝐎 𝐅𝐎𝐔𝐆𝐇𝐓 𝐀𝐆𝐀𝐈𝐍𝐒𝐓 𝐘𝐎𝐔, 𝐄𝐗𝐏𝐄𝐋𝐋𝐄𝐃 𝐘𝐎𝐔 𝐀𝐍𝐃 𝐇𝐄𝐋𝐏𝐄𝐃 𝐓𝐎 𝐄𝐗𝐏𝐄𝐋 𝐘𝐎𝐔.

𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐄𝐱𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐛𝐢𝐝𝐬 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐛𝐞𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐦𝐲.’ 𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐇𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭 𝐚𝐠𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭 𝐛𝐞𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦, 𝐛𝐲 𝐬𝐚𝐲𝐢𝐧𝐠,
‘𝐀𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐨𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐰𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐛𝐞𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦, 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐠𝐝𝐨𝐞𝐫𝐬.’ 𝐀𝐬 𝐇𝐞 𝐬𝐚𝐢𝐝;

‘𝐎 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞! 𝐓𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐬 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬, 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐡 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫. 𝐀𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐟 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐚𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐭𝐚𝐤𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 (𝐚𝐬 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬), 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐬𝐮𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐲, 𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦. 𝐕𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐥𝐲, 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐠𝐮𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐩𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 đ–đ‘đŽđđ†đƒđŽđ„đ‘đ’â€™ (𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 𝟓:𝟓𝟏)…” (𝐓𝐚𝐟𝐬𝐢𝐫 𝐈𝐛𝐧 𝐊𝐚𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐫 (𝐀𝐛𝐫𝐢𝐝𝐠𝐞𝐝) [𝐀𝐛𝐫𝐢𝐝𝐠𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐀 𝐆𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐩 𝐨𝐟 𝐒𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐬 𝐔𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐒𝐮𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐢𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐎𝐟 𝐒𝐡𝐚𝐲𝐤𝐡 𝐒𝐚𝐟𝐢𝐮𝐫-𝐑𝐚𝐡𝐦𝐚𝐧 𝐀𝐥-𝐌𝐮𝐛𝐚𝐫𝐚𝐤𝐩𝐮𝐫𝐢. 𝐌𝐚𝐤𝐭𝐚𝐛𝐚 𝐃𝐚𝐫-𝐮𝐬-𝐒𝐚𝐥𝐚𝐦 – 𝐒𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐝 𝐄𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟑], 𝐯𝐨𝐥𝐮𝐦𝐞 𝟗, 𝐩𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝟓𝟗𝟕 – 𝟓𝟗𝟖)

𝐌𝐨𝐫𝐞𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐚 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐠𝐞𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐢𝐧 𝐡𝐚𝐫𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐲 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐚𝐠𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐲𝐨𝐧𝐞,

“𝐎 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐝, 𝐛𝐞 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐟𝐢𝐫𝐦 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡, 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐣𝐮𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐞, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐝𝐨 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐥𝐞𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐚 𝐩𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐛𝐞𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐣𝐮𝐬𝐭. 𝐁𝐞 𝐣𝐮𝐬𝐭; 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐨 𝐫𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭𝐞𝐨𝐮𝐬𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐬. 𝐀𝐧𝐝 𝐟𝐞𝐚𝐫 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡; 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐝, 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐢𝐬 𝐀𝐜𝐪𝐮𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐝𝐨.” – 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 𝟓:𝟖

𝐀𝐧𝐝

“𝐎 𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐝, 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐝 𝐖𝐞 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐜𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐦𝐚𝐥𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐟𝐞𝐦𝐚𝐥𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐦𝐚𝐝𝐞 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐩𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐛𝐞𝐬 đ­đĄđšđ­ 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐦𝐚𝐲 𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫. đˆđ§đđžđžđ, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐨𝐬𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐨𝐬𝐭 𝐫𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭𝐞𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐲𝐨𝐮. 𝐈𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐝, 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐢𝐬 𝐊𝐧𝐨𝐰𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐀𝐜𝐪𝐮𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐝.” – 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 𝟒𝟗:𝟏𝟑

𝐀𝐧𝐝

“𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐝𝐨𝐞𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐛𝐢𝐝 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐝𝐨 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐟𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐛𝐞𝐜𝐚𝐮𝐬𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐝𝐨 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐞𝐥 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐡𝐨𝐦𝐞𝐬 – 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐛𝐞𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐫𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭𝐞𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐭𝐨𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐣𝐮𝐬𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐨𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦. 𝐈𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐝, 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐥𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐚𝐜𝐭 𝐣𝐮𝐬𝐭𝐥𝐲. 

𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐛𝐢𝐝𝐬 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐟𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐛𝐞𝐜𝐚𝐮𝐬𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐞𝐥 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐡𝐨𝐦𝐞𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐢𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐮𝐥𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧 – [𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐛𝐢𝐝𝐬] 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦. 𝐀𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐡𝐨𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐞𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦, 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐠𝐝𝐨𝐞𝐫𝐬.” – 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 𝟔𝟎:𝟖-𝟗

𝐖𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐪𝐮𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐜𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐚 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬, 𝐮𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝟓:𝟓𝟏 𝐚𝐬 𝐞𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞: 𝐖𝐡𝐲 𝐝𝐨𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐦𝐚𝐫𝐫𝐢𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐭𝐰𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐚 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐦𝐚𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧 (𝐨𝐫 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐢𝐬𝐡) 𝐰𝐨𝐦𝐚𝐧? 𝐑𝐞𝐚𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐨𝐰, (‘𝐏𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐁𝐨𝐨𝐤’ – 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬),

“𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐝𝐚𝐲 𝐚𝐫𝐞 (𝐚𝐥𝐥) 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬 𝐠𝐨𝐨𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐩𝐮𝐫𝐞 𝐦𝐚𝐝𝐞 𝐥𝐚𝐰𝐟𝐮𝐥 𝐮𝐧𝐭𝐨 𝐲𝐨𝐮. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐨𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐁𝐨𝐨𝐤 𝐢𝐬 𝐥𝐚𝐰𝐟𝐮𝐥 𝐮𝐧𝐭𝐨 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐬 𝐢𝐬 𝐥𝐚𝐰𝐟𝐮𝐥 𝐮𝐧𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦. (𝐋𝐚𝐰𝐟𝐮𝐥 𝐮𝐧𝐭𝐨 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐢𝐧 𝐦𝐚𝐫𝐫𝐢𝐚𝐠𝐞) 𝐚𝐫𝐞 (𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲) 𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐬𝐭𝐞 𝐰𝐨𝐦𝐞𝐧 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬, 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐬𝐭𝐞 𝐰𝐨𝐦𝐞𝐧 𝐚𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐁𝐨𝐨𝐤, 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐞𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞,- 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐲𝐞 𝐠𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐝𝐮𝐞 𝐝𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐬, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐝𝐞𝐬𝐢𝐫𝐞 𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐭𝐲, 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐥𝐞𝐰𝐝𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐬, 𝐧𝐨𝐫 𝐬𝐞𝐜𝐫𝐞𝐭 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐠𝐮𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐟 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐣𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐬 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐭𝐡, 𝐟𝐫𝐮𝐢𝐭𝐥𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐢𝐬 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐤, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐟𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐛𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐤𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐥𝐨𝐬𝐭 (𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐮𝐚𝐥 𝐠𝐨𝐨𝐝).” – 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 𝟓:𝟓

𝐒𝐮𝐦𝐦𝐚𝐫𝐲:

𝐈𝐧 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐜𝐥𝐮𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐰𝐞 𝐞𝐱𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐡𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐱𝐭, 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐬𝐞𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐐. 𝟓:𝟓𝟏 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐡𝐢𝐛𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐫 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬. 𝐑𝐞𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝟔𝟎:𝟏 𝐠𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐬 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐰𝐞𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝟓:𝟓𝟏 𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐢𝐧 𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐉𝐞𝐰𝐬 𝐟𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐬. 𝐌𝐨𝐫𝐞𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫, 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐧-𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐬𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐀𝐫𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐜 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐝 ‘𝐚𝐰𝐥𝐢𝐲𝐚’ 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐛𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐬 ‘𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐬’, ‘𝐠𝐮𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬’ 𝐚𝐧𝐝 ‘𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐬’, 𝐧𝐨𝐭 ‘𝐟𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬’ 𝐚𝐬 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐬𝐮𝐠𝐠𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐝.

𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐊𝐧𝐨𝐰𝐬 𝐁𝐞𝐬𝐭.

𝐑𝐞𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐬:

How Should Jews and Christians be treated? Quran (2:109) or Quran (9:29)

Does Islam order Muslims to not take Jews, Christians and other non-Muslims as friends?

Friendship With Non-Muslims: Explaining Qur’an verse 5:51

Does Islam really order Muslims to not take Jews, Christians, and other non-Muslims as friends?

Does the Bible Allow Jews and Christians to be Friends with Unbelievers?

Calling Christians to Islam

Commentary on the verse “And insult not those whom they (disbelievers) worship besides Allah, lest they insult Allah wrongfully without knowledge” Quran (6:108)

It is essential to respond to those who defame the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him)

𝐑𝐞𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐬:

[𝟏] đ‘𝐾𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐓𝐨𝐥𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐖𝐨𝐫𝐥𝐝 𝐑𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 [𝐂𝐨𝐩𝐲𝐫𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟖 𝐁𝐲 𝐓𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐭𝐨𝐧 𝐅𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐏𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐬] – 𝐈𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐡𝐢𝐦 𝐊𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐧 𝐩𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝟐𝟔𝟒
[𝟐] đ“𝐡𝐾 𝐌𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐌𝐮𝐡𝐚𝐦𝐦𝐚𝐝 𝐀𝐬𝐚𝐝 𝐏𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝟐𝟑𝟑
[𝟑] đ“𝐡𝐾 𝐇𝐨𝐥𝐲 𝐐𝐮𝐫’𝐚𝐧 𝐀𝐫𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐜 𝐓𝐞𝐱𝐭 𝐖𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐄𝐧𝐠𝐥𝐢𝐬𝐡 𝐓𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 & 𝐒𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐭 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐫𝐲 𝐁𝐲 𝐌𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐤 𝐆𝐡𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐦 𝐅𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐝 𝐩𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝟐𝟓𝟎
[𝟒] đ“𝐡𝐾 𝐇𝐨𝐥𝐲 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 𝐀𝐫𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐜 𝐓𝐞𝐱𝐭 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐄𝐧𝐠𝐥𝐢𝐬𝐡 𝐓𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐫𝐲, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐡𝐞𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐈𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐝𝐮𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 [𝐘𝐞𝐚𝐫 𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟐 𝐄𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧] 𝐛𝐲 𝐌𝐚𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐚 𝐌𝐮𝐡𝐚𝐦𝐦𝐚𝐝 𝐀𝐥𝐢 𝐩𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝟐𝟔𝟒
[𝟓] đ‰đžđ°đ˘đŹđĄ 𝐓𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐭: 𝐀𝐧 𝐈𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐝𝐮𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 [𝐂𝐨𝐩𝐲𝐫𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟔] 𝐁𝐲 𝐎𝐥𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐋𝐞𝐚𝐦𝐚𝐧 𝐏𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝟕𝟎 – 𝟕𝟏
[𝟔] đŒđ˘đŹđŞđŽđ¨đ­đ˘đ§đ  𝐌𝐮𝐡𝐚𝐦𝐦𝐚𝐝 – 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐂𝐡𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐧𝐠𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐂𝐡𝐨𝐢𝐜𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐈𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭’𝐬 𝐋𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐜𝐲, 𝐁𝐲 𝐉𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐧 𝐀. 𝐂. 𝐁𝐫𝐨𝐰𝐧, 𝐩𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝟐𝟏𝟎