Modern Medicine Confirms that the Heart has a Brain that thinks and reasons, as mentioned in the Glorious Holy Quran fifteen centuries ago- Quran (22:46)

𝐌𝐨𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐧 𝐌𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐧𝐞 𝐂𝐨𝐧𝐟𝐢𝐫𝐦𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐚 𝐁𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐤𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐨𝐧𝐬, 𝐚𝐬 𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐆𝐥𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐇𝐨𝐥𝐲 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 𝐟𝐢𝐟𝐭𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐜𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐚𝐠𝐨- 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 (𝟐𝟐:𝟒𝟔)


Mohamad Mostafa Nassar

Twitter:@NassarMohamadMR

𝐀𝐧𝐭𝐢-𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐜 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬:

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐝 “𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭” 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐬𝐲𝐧𝐨𝐧𝐲𝐦𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐧𝐮𝐦𝐞𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞𝐬, 𝐞𝐱𝐜𝐞𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚 𝐡𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐚𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐡𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐲 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞𝐬. 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐀𝐥𝐦𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭𝐲 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐞𝐚𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐟𝐚𝐢𝐭𝐡, 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐟, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲. 𝐇𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐦𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦, 𝐞𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬, 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐬𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐦𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐲 𝐚 𝐦𝐮𝐬𝐜𝐥𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐩𝐮𝐦𝐩𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐛𝐥𝐨𝐨𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐟𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐲 𝐜𝐥𝐚𝐢𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐆𝐥𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐢𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐚 𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜 𝐞𝐫𝐫𝐨𝐫.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐑𝐞𝐬𝐩𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐞:

𝐈𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲, 𝐢𝐧 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐩𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐞 𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐠𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐦𝐚𝐝𝐞 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐈𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐦𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐨𝐛𝐞𝐬, 𝐰𝐞 𝐰𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐛𝐞𝐠𝐢𝐧 𝐛𝐲 𝐜𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐨𝐥𝐲 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐨𝐧𝐨𝐫𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐜 𝐡𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐚𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐛𝐮𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐨 𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠, 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐜𝐞𝐩𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐣𝐮𝐝𝐠𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐨𝐧 𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐬.

𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐛𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 “𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭, 𝐌𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐒𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐢𝐭 𝐌𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐏𝐬𝐲𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐜 𝐢𝐬 𝐚 𝐑𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐜𝐡 𝐏𝐚𝐩𝐞𝐫 𝐁𝐲: 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐟𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐨𝐫 𝐌𝐨𝐡𝐚𝐦𝐞𝐝 𝐎𝐦𝐚𝐫 𝐒𝐚𝐥𝐞𝐦- 𝐑𝐨𝐲𝐚𝐥 𝐂𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐠𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐏𝐬𝐲𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬, 𝐔𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐊𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐝𝐨𝐦 𝐨𝐟 𝐆𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭 𝐁𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐢𝐧.” 𝐖𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐧𝐮𝐦𝐞𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐖𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐧 𝐦𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜 𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐬 𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐧𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐦𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐜𝐡 𝐩𝐚𝐩𝐞𝐫 𝐛𝐲 𝐧𝐨𝐧-𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐖𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐧 𝐩𝐡𝐲𝐬𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐳𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐢𝐧 𝐜𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐲, 𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐥 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐡, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐩𝐬𝐲𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐲.

𝐈𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜 𝐞𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐬𝐮𝐠𝐠𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭, 𝐛𝐞𝐲𝐨𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐩𝐮𝐦𝐩𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐟𝐮𝐧𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐥𝐮𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧’𝐬 𝐫𝐨𝐥𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐝𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧-𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐮𝐦𝐚𝐧 𝐛𝐨𝐝𝐲?

𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐢𝐬 𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐫𝐠𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜 𝐞𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐬𝐮𝐠𝐠𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐦𝐚𝐲 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐥𝐮𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐝𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧-𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠. 𝐇𝐞𝐫𝐞’𝐬 𝐚 𝐛𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐤𝐝𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐮𝐫𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐜𝐡:

𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭-𝐁𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐂𝐨𝐧𝐧𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧:

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐢𝐬𝐧’𝐭 𝐣𝐮𝐬𝐭 𝐚 𝐩𝐮𝐦𝐩; 𝐢𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐚 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐱 𝐧𝐞𝐭𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐤 𝐨𝐟 𝐧𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧. 𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐰𝐨-𝐰𝐚𝐲 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐡𝐰𝐚𝐲 𝐬𝐮𝐠𝐠𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐢𝐠𝐧𝐚𝐥𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐦𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐥𝐮𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐝𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧-𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠. 𝐅𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐞𝐫’𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐥𝐞 𝐨𝐧 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭’𝐬 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐬𝐨𝐫𝐲 𝐧𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐞𝐬


𝐍𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐀𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐑𝐚𝐭𝐞:

𝐒𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐦𝐚𝐥𝐬 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐰 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐢𝐧 𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐫𝐞𝐠𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐯𝐨𝐥𝐯𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐝𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧-𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠. 𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐬𝐮𝐠𝐠𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐬 𝐚 𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐤 𝐛𝐞𝐭𝐰𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐨𝐝𝐲’𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞 (𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞) 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐨𝐰 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐜𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐢𝐜𝐞𝐬. 𝐌𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐭 𝐒𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐢 𝐬𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐲 𝐨𝐧 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐝𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧-𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠


𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭’𝐬 𝐍𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐦𝐢𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐬:

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐝𝐮𝐜𝐞𝐬 𝐧𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐦𝐢𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐥𝐢𝐤𝐞 𝐨𝐱𝐲𝐭𝐨𝐜𝐢𝐧, 𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐨𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐥𝐢𝐤𝐞 𝐥𝐨𝐯𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐛𝐨𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠. 𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐬 𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭’𝐬 𝐩𝐨𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐫𝐨𝐥𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐥𝐮𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐝𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬.

𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐁𝐞𝐠𝐢𝐧𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭

𝐄𝐱𝐚𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐬 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐆𝐥𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐇𝐨𝐥𝐲 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧:

𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐬𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐨𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠. 𝐇𝐞𝐫𝐞, 𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐨𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐢𝐭, 𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐧𝐨 𝐨𝐫𝐠𝐚𝐧 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐤𝐬 𝐢𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐝𝐨𝐞𝐬𝐧’𝐭.

𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐄𝐱𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐇𝐞 𝐒𝐚𝐲𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐆𝐥𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐇𝐨𝐥𝐲 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧:

“𝐇𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐯𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐬 𝐦𝐚𝐲 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐨𝐧, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐬 𝐦𝐚𝐲 𝐥𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐧? 𝐈𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐝, 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐲𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐛𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐝, 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐠𝐫𝐨𝐰 𝐛𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐝.” 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 (𝟐𝟐:𝟒𝟔)

𝐀𝐧𝐝

𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐄𝐱𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐇𝐞 𝐒𝐚𝐲𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐆𝐥𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐇𝐨𝐥𝐲 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧:

” 𝐘𝐨𝐮 𝐬𝐞𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐬𝐢𝐜𝐤𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐬 𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐠𝐮𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐩, 𝐬𝐚𝐲𝐢𝐧𝐠 ˹𝐢𝐧 𝐣𝐮𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧˺, “𝐖𝐞 𝐟𝐞𝐚𝐫 𝐚 𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐮𝐧𝐞 𝐰𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐤𝐞 𝐮𝐬.” 𝐁𝐮𝐭 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐡𝐚𝐩𝐬 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐰𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐛𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭 ˹𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫˺ 𝐯𝐢𝐜𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐲 𝐨𝐫 𝐚𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐟𝐚𝐯𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐛𝐲 𝐇𝐢𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐝, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐰𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐫𝐞𝐠𝐫𝐞𝐭 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐡𝐢𝐝𝐝𝐞𝐧 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐬.” 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 (𝟓:𝟓𝟐)

𝐀𝐧𝐝

𝐀𝐥𝐦𝐨𝐬𝐭 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐲𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞, 𝐟𝐞𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐝𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠. 𝐖𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐟𝐞𝐞𝐥 𝐢𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐬𝐚𝐲 𝐮𝐬𝐮𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲. 𝐈𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐬 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐨𝐨𝐭, 𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐮𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐥 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐫𝐮𝐢𝐭. 𝐈𝐬 𝐢𝐭 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐤 𝐛𝐞𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐚𝐤, 𝐨𝐫 𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐟𝐞𝐞𝐥 𝐛𝐞𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐝𝐨?

𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐄𝐱𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐇𝐞 𝐒𝐚𝐲𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐆𝐥𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐇𝐨𝐥𝐲 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧:

“𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐃𝐚𝐲 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐧𝐞𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐰𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐡 𝐧𝐨𝐫 𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐥𝐝𝐫𝐞𝐧 𝐰𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐛𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐛𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐟𝐢𝐭. 𝐎𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐚 𝐩𝐮𝐫𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 ˹𝐰𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐛𝐞 𝐬𝐚𝐯𝐞𝐝˺.” 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 (𝟐𝟔:𝟖𝟖-𝟖𝟗)

𝐀𝐧𝐝

𝐘𝐨𝐮 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐚 𝐝𝐚𝐦𝐚𝐠𝐞𝐝 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐭 𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐞𝐬 𝐚 𝐥𝐨𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐝𝐢𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞. 𝐒𝐨 𝐝𝐨𝐧’𝐭 𝐭𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐡𝐚𝐥𝐟-𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐞𝐝𝐥𝐲!

𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐄𝐱𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐇𝐞 𝐒𝐚𝐲𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐆𝐥𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐇𝐨𝐥𝐲 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧:

“𝐃𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧? 𝐎𝐫 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐥𝐨𝐜𝐤𝐬 𝐮𝐩𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐬?? 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 (𝟐𝟒:𝟒𝟕)

𝐀𝐧𝐝

𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐜𝐚𝐧’𝐭 𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐢𝐟 𝐨𝐧𝐞’𝐬 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐥𝐨𝐜𝐤𝐞𝐝. 𝐏𝐞𝐫𝐡𝐚𝐩𝐬 𝐰𝐞 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐭𝐫𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐤 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐧 𝐨𝐩𝐞𝐧 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐚𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐚𝐧 𝐨𝐩𝐞𝐧 𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐝, 𝐛𝐞𝐜𝐚𝐮𝐬𝐞 𝐢𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐩𝐞𝐧 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐮𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐨𝐩𝐞𝐧, 𝐭𝐨𝐨, 𝐛𝐞𝐜𝐚𝐮𝐬𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐬𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐭𝐬 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭. 𝐆𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭 𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐤 𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐤𝐞? 𝐇𝐨𝐰 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬: 𝐆𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐬 𝐛𝐨𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐤𝐞.

𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐄𝐱𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐇𝐞 𝐒𝐚𝐲𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐆𝐥𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐇𝐨𝐥𝐲 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧:

“𝐀𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐝 𝐟𝐢𝐫𝐦𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐨𝐠𝐞𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡𝟏 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐝𝐨 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐛𝐞 𝐝𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐝. 𝐑𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐦𝐛𝐞𝐫 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡’𝐬 𝐟𝐚𝐯𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐮𝐩𝐨𝐧 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐦𝐢𝐞𝐬, 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐇𝐞 𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐬, 𝐬𝐨 𝐲𝐨𝐮—𝐛𝐲 𝐇𝐢𝐬 𝐠𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐞—𝐛𝐞𝐜𝐚𝐦𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐬. 𝐀𝐧𝐝 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐤 𝐨𝐟 𝐚 𝐟𝐢𝐞𝐫𝐲 𝐩𝐢𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐇𝐞 𝐬𝐚𝐯𝐞𝐝 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐢𝐭. 𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐬 𝐡𝐨𝐰 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐞𝐬 𝐇𝐢𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐜𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐫 𝐭𝐨 𝐲𝐨𝐮, 𝐬𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐦𝐚𝐲 𝐛𝐞 ˹𝐫𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭𝐥𝐲˺ 𝐠𝐮𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐝.” 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 (𝟑:𝟏𝟎𝟑)

𝐄𝐱𝐚𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞: 𝐅𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐍𝐨𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐜 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡:

𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐄𝐱𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐇𝐞 𝐬𝐚𝐢𝐝”

“𝐈 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐌𝐲 𝐫𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭𝐞𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐬𝐥𝐚𝐯𝐞𝐬 (𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐞𝐱𝐜𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬) 𝐚𝐬 𝐧𝐨 𝐞𝐲𝐞 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐬𝐞𝐞𝐧, 𝐧𝐨𝐫 𝐚𝐧 𝐞𝐚𝐫 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐫 𝐚 𝐡𝐮𝐦𝐚𝐧 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐤 𝐨𝐟” 𝐒𝐚𝐡𝐢𝐡 𝐚𝐥-𝐁𝐮𝐤𝐡𝐚𝐫𝐢 𝟕𝟒𝟗𝟖

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐢𝐦𝐚𝐠𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧:

𝐈𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐧𝐚𝐫𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐀𝐛𝐮 𝐇𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞:


𝐌𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐫 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 () 𝐬𝐚𝐢𝐝 : “𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐠𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐦𝐲 𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐯𝐢𝐥 𝐬𝐮𝐠𝐠𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐬, 𝐬𝐨 𝐥𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐝𝐨 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐚𝐜𝐭 𝐮𝐩𝐨𝐧 𝐢𝐭 𝐨𝐫 𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐚𝐤 𝐨𝐟 𝐢𝐭, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐜𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐝𝐨.”

𝐒𝐮𝐧𝐚𝐧 𝐈𝐛𝐧 𝐌𝐚𝐣𝐚𝐡 𝟐𝟎𝟒𝟒

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐞 𝐝𝐢𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐭𝐨𝐦𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐝 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐮𝐬 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐜𝐚𝐧𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐛𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐨𝐥𝐯𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝐠𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐝𝐨𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬, 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐛𝐲 𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐚𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐭𝐰𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐰𝐨 𝐬𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐦𝐬.

𝐀𝐛𝐮 𝐇𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐫𝐚 𝐫𝐞𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡’𝐬 𝐌𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐫 () 𝐚𝐬 𝐬𝐚𝐲𝐢𝐧𝐠:

“𝐕𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐥𝐲 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐝𝐨𝐞𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐥𝐨𝐨𝐤 𝐭𝐨 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐟𝐚𝐜𝐞𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐰𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐡 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐇𝐞 𝐥𝐨𝐨𝐤𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐝𝐬.” 𝐒𝐚𝐡𝐢𝐡 𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝟐𝟓𝟔𝟒𝐜

𝐘𝐨𝐮 𝐜𝐚𝐧’𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐚 𝐬𝐰𝐞𝐞𝐭 𝐟𝐫𝐮𝐢𝐭 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐚 𝐛𝐢𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐫𝐨𝐨𝐭:

𝐍𝐚𝐫𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐀𝐛𝐮 𝐇𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐡:
“𝐈 𝐜𝐚𝐦𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 () 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐝 𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐦𝐲 𝐠𝐚𝐫𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐧𝐞𝐱𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐡𝐢𝐦, 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐨𝐨𝐤 𝐢𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐠𝐚𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐭 𝐚𝐭 𝐦𝐲 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭, 𝐬𝐨 𝐈 𝐝𝐢𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐠𝐞𝐭 𝐚𝐟𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 [𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐇𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐡].” 𝐉𝐚𝐦𝐢` 𝐚𝐭-𝐓𝐢𝐫𝐦𝐢𝐝𝐡𝐢 𝟑𝟖𝟑𝟒

𝐌𝐨𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐧 𝐌𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐒𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜 𝐄𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞:

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐁𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 (𝟐𝟐:𝟒𝟔) 𝐚 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐲 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐭 𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐨:

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐟𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐬𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐬𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐝𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐢𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐞𝐧𝐬, 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐥𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐞𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐟𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐬𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐝𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐞𝐡𝐚𝐧𝐝. 𝐒𝐨 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐭 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐛𝐮𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐨𝐮𝐭𝐩𝐮𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐭𝐬, 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐦𝐚𝐲 𝐛𝐞 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐲𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐥𝐮𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐜𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐚 𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐧𝐠𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐨𝐰 𝐰𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐤.

𝐈𝐧 𝟏𝟗𝟕𝟒, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐅𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐡 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐜𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐆𝐚𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐕𝐢𝐠𝐢𝐞𝐫, 𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐚𝐠𝐮𝐬 𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐞 (𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐜𝐚𝐫𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐬𝐢𝐠𝐧𝐚𝐥𝐬 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧) 𝐢𝐧 𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐬𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐦 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐬𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐲 𝐟𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧’𝐬 𝐝𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬.

𝐈𝐧 𝟏𝟗𝟖𝟑, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐥𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐧 𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐨𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐞 𝐠𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐚 𝐧𝐞𝐰 𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐜𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐮𝐫𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐜 𝐟𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐨𝐫 (𝐀𝐍𝐅), 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐚𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐬 𝐛𝐥𝐨𝐨𝐝 𝐯𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐬, 𝐤𝐢𝐝𝐧𝐞𝐲𝐬, 𝐚𝐝𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐠𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐝𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐫𝐞𝐠𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐲 𝐫𝐞𝐠𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧, 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐝𝐮𝐜𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭.

𝐃𝐫. 𝐉. 𝐀𝐧𝐝𝐫𝐞𝐰 𝐀𝐫𝐦𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐜𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬 𝐚 𝐜𝐞𝐥𝐥 𝐭𝐲𝐩𝐞 𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐚𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐜 𝐜𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐚𝐜 𝐚𝐝𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐠𝐢𝐜 (𝐈𝐂𝐀), 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐬𝐲𝐧𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐢𝐳𝐞𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐧𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐦𝐢𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐨𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐝𝐮𝐜𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐛𝐲 𝐧𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐞 𝐠𝐚𝐧𝐠𝐥𝐢𝐚.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐢𝐧 𝐚𝐧 𝐮𝐧𝐛𝐨𝐫𝐧 𝐟𝐞𝐭𝐮𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐞𝐝, 𝐚 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐜𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬 𝐜𝐚𝐥𝐥 “𝐚𝐮𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐡𝐲𝐭𝐡𝐦𝐢𝐜.”

𝐃𝐫. 𝐀𝐫𝐦𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐝𝐮𝐜𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐩𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐚 𝐟𝐮𝐧𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 “𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧” 𝐢𝐧 𝟏𝟗𝟗𝟏. 𝐂𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐧 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐩𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐭𝐲, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭’𝐬 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐢𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐚𝐧 𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐧𝐞𝐭𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐤 𝐨𝐟 𝐧𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐬, 𝐬𝐮𝐩𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭 𝐜𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐧𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐦𝐢𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐞𝐧𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐜𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐧, 𝐫𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐦𝐛𝐞𝐫, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐝𝐮𝐜𝐞 𝐟𝐞𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐦𝐢𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐜𝐞𝐥𝐥 𝐭𝐨 𝐚𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫.

“𝐖𝐞 𝐨𝐛𝐬𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡 𝐢𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐝 𝐚 𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐜𝐞𝐩𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐬,” 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐌𝐜𝐂𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐲.

𝐀𝐜𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐨 𝐆𝐨𝐥𝐞𝐦𝐚𝐧, 𝐢𝐭’𝐬 𝐚 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐨𝐧’𝐬 𝐄𝐐 (𝐄𝐦𝐨𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐐𝐮𝐨𝐭𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐭) 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐞𝐧𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐦 𝐭𝐨 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐜𝐞𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐞 𝐚𝐬 𝐦𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐨𝐫 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐈𝐐 (𝐈𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐨𝐭𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐭).

𝐃𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 ‘𝟔𝟎𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 ’𝟕𝟎𝐬 𝐩𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐞𝐞𝐫 𝐩𝐡𝐲𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬 𝐉𝐨𝐡𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐁𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐜𝐞 𝐋𝐚𝐜𝐞𝐲 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐝𝐮𝐜𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐜𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐮𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐢𝐧 𝐰𝐚𝐲𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐠𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐡𝐨𝐰 𝐰𝐞 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐜𝐞𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐥𝐝 𝐚𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝 𝐮𝐬.

𝐍𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐢𝐬𝐭 𝐀𝐧𝐭𝐨𝐧𝐢𝐨 𝐃𝐚𝐦𝐚𝐬𝐢𝐨 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐢𝐧 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐛𝐨𝐨𝐤 𝐃𝐞𝐬𝐜𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐞𝐬’ 𝐄𝐫𝐫𝐨𝐫, 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐦𝐩𝐡𝐚𝐬𝐢𝐳𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐝𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧-𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠. 𝐇𝐞 𝐩𝐨𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐝𝐚𝐦𝐚𝐠𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐠𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐜𝐨𝐠𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐬𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐦𝐬 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐧𝐨 𝐥𝐨𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐫 𝐞𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐥𝐲 𝐟𝐮𝐧𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐝𝐚𝐲-𝐭𝐨-𝐝𝐚𝐲 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐥𝐝, 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐟𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐧𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐥.

𝐅𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐛𝐲 𝐌𝐨𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐧 𝐒𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞:

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 𝐬𝐚𝐲𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐬 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐤. 𝐒𝐤𝐞𝐩𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐬 𝐜𝐥𝐚𝐢𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐰𝐡𝐨𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐰𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 𝐦𝐚𝐝𝐞 𝐚 𝐦𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐤𝐞, 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐜𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐬 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐤. 𝐓𝐨𝐝𝐚𝐲 𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐜𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐜𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭.

𝐈𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐢𝐞𝐥𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐧𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐨𝐜𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐲, 𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐜𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐜 𝐧𝐞𝐭𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐬𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐦. 𝐀 𝐧𝐞𝐭𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐤 𝐨𝐟 𝐁𝐑𝐀𝐈𝐍 𝐜𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝟒𝟎,𝟎𝟎𝟎 𝐧𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐬! 𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐠𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐩𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐜𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧. 𝐄𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐝𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐝𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐚 𝐭𝐲𝐩𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐦𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐲. 𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐦𝐞𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐤 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭!

𝐂𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐍𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐡𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭, 𝐖𝐨𝐰. 𝐘𝐨𝐮 𝐂𝐚𝐧 𝐋𝐈𝐓𝐄𝐑𝐀𝐋𝐋𝐘 𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐤 𝐖𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐘𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭, 𝟐𝟎𝟏𝟒.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝 𝟖𝟔 𝐛𝐢𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐧𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐥𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝟒𝟎 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐬𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐧𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐬. 𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐦𝐞𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝟐 𝐦𝐢𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞𝐬 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐧𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭; 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬 𝐣𝐮𝐬𝐭 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐜𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐬𝐢𝐠𝐧𝐚𝐥𝐬 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐦𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐚 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐭 𝐭𝐰𝐨-𝐰𝐚𝐲 𝐝𝐢𝐚𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐮𝐞 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧. 𝐁𝐮𝐭, 𝐌𝐜𝐂𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐲 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐜𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐨𝐯𝐚𝐬𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐫 𝐬𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐦 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐟𝐚𝐫 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐬𝐢𝐠𝐧𝐚𝐥𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐢𝐬 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭…

𝐑𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐤 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐥𝐲 𝐧𝐞𝐰 𝐟𝐢𝐞𝐥𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐧𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐨𝐜𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐲 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐟𝐢𝐫𝐦𝐥𝐲 𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐢𝐬𝐡𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐚 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐬𝐨𝐫𝐲 𝐨𝐫𝐠𝐚𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐧 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐨𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐜𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐜𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫, 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐧 𝐞𝐱𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐜 𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐬𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭’𝐬 𝐬𝐮𝐟𝐟𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐬𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐪𝐮𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐲 𝐚𝐬 𝐚 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧. 𝐈𝐭𝐬 𝐜𝐢𝐫𝐜𝐮𝐢𝐭𝐫𝐲 𝐞𝐧𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐧, 𝐫𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐦𝐛𝐞𝐫, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐟𝐮𝐧𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐝𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐩𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧.

𝐓𝐨 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐲𝐨𝐧𝐞’𝐬 𝐬𝐮𝐫𝐩𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐞, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐝𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭’𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐜 𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐬𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐦 𝐢𝐬 𝐚 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐱, 𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐟-𝐨𝐫𝐠𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐳𝐞𝐝 𝐬𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐦; 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐧𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐭𝐲, 𝐨𝐫 𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐫𝐞𝐨𝐫𝐠𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐳𝐞 𝐢𝐭𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐟 𝐛𝐲 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐧𝐞𝐰 𝐧𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐧𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐛𝐨𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐥𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐦, 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐰𝐞𝐥𝐥 𝐝𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝.

𝐍𝐨𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐜 𝐒𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐦𝐬, 𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐅𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 – 𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐁𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐒𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞, 𝟐𝟎𝟐𝟐

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐜𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐬. 𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐥𝐲, 𝐡𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐲𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 𝟏𝟒𝟎𝟎 𝐲𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐢𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐜𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐝.

𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 (𝟐𝟐:𝟒𝟔):

“𝐇𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐯𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐬 𝐦𝐚𝐲 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐨𝐧, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐬 𝐦𝐚𝐲 𝐥𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐧? 𝐈𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐞𝐝, 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐲𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐛𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐝, 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐠𝐫𝐨𝐰 𝐛𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐝.”

٤٦ أَفَلَمْ يَسِيرُوا فِي الْأَرْضِ فَتَكُونَ لَهُمْ قُلُوبٌ يَعْقِلُونَ بِهَا أَوْ آذَانٌ يَسْمَعُونَ بِهَا ۖ فَإِنَّهَا لَا تَعْمَى الْأَبْصَارُ وَلَٰكِنْ تَعْمَى الْقُلُوبُ الَّتِي فِي الصُّدُورِ

“𝐊𝐮𝐥𝐨𝐨𝐛 قُلُوبٌ“𝐦𝐞𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐬. 𝐈𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐫 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐬 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐤. 𝐓𝐨𝐝𝐚𝐲 𝐰𝐞 𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐜𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐞𝐱𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐬 𝐬𝐢𝐠𝐧𝐚𝐥𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧.

𝐇𝐨𝐰 𝐜𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐚 𝐦𝐚𝐧 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐝𝐢𝐝 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐝 𝐨𝐫 𝐰𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐞 “𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐭 𝐌𝐮𝐡𝐚𝐦𝐦𝐞𝐝 𝐩𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐞 𝐛𝐞 𝐮𝐩𝐨𝐧 𝐡𝐢𝐦 𝐰𝐡𝐨 𝐥𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐝 𝟏𝟒𝟒𝟓 𝐲𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐬 𝐚𝐠𝐨 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐜𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐬?

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐂𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐬 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧 (𝟐𝟒:𝟒𝟔)– 𝐀 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐲 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐭 𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐨:

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭, 𝐌𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐒𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐢𝐭 𝐌𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐏𝐬𝐲𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐜 𝐢𝐬 𝐚 𝐑𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐜𝐡 𝐏𝐚𝐩𝐞𝐫 𝐁𝐲: 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐟𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐨𝐫 𝐌𝐨𝐡𝐚𝐦𝐞𝐝 𝐎𝐦𝐚𝐫 𝐒𝐚𝐥𝐞𝐦– 𝐑𝐨𝐲𝐚𝐥 𝐂𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐠𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐏𝐬𝐲𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬, 𝐔𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐊𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐝𝐨𝐦 𝐨𝐟 𝐆𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭 𝐁𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐢𝐧. 𝐖𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐧𝐮𝐦𝐞𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐖𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐧 𝐦𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜 𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐬 𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐧𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐦𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐜𝐡 𝐩𝐚𝐩𝐞𝐫 𝐛𝐲 𝐧𝐨𝐧-𝐌𝐮𝐬𝐥𝐢𝐦 𝐖𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐧 𝐩𝐡𝐲𝐬𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐬 𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐳𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐢𝐧 𝐜𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐲, 𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐥 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐡, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐩𝐬𝐲𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐲.

𝐈𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐝𝐮𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐩𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐜𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐩𝐬𝐲𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐩𝐬𝐲𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬. 𝐇𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫, 𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐭𝐥𝐞 𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐩𝐚𝐢𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐦𝐨𝐬𝐭 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐥 𝐭𝐞𝐱𝐭𝐛𝐨𝐨𝐤𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐭 𝐢𝐬𝐬𝐮𝐞, 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐢𝐬 𝐮𝐬𝐮𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐬𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐢𝐞𝐝 𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 ‘𝐏𝐡𝐢𝐥𝐨𝐬𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐩𝐬𝐲𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐲/𝐩𝐬𝐲𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐲’. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐩𝐬𝐲𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐦𝐨𝐝𝐞𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐡𝐞𝐥𝐩 𝐡𝐢𝐦 𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐭’𝐬 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐛𝐥𝐞𝐦𝐬 (𝐒𝐚𝐥𝐞𝐦, 𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟒).

𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐢𝐞𝐰 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐜𝐮𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐬𝐨𝐦𝐞 𝐚𝐬𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐨𝐧𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐝, 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐩 𝐨𝐧 𝐚 𝐥𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐫𝐨𝐚𝐝. 𝐈𝐧 𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐡𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐲, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬, 𝐩𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐢𝐬𝐝𝐨𝐦. 𝐀𝐥𝐬𝐨, 𝐩𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐮𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐟𝐞𝐞𝐥 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐞𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐫 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐬𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐥𝐨𝐯𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐞𝐚 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭.

𝐇𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫, 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐚𝐬𝐭, 𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬 𝐞𝐦𝐩𝐡𝐚𝐬𝐢𝐳𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐨𝐥𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐝 𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐩𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐬. 𝐈𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐥𝐲, 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐬𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐥𝐨𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐩𝐡𝐲𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐦𝐞𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐬𝐦𝐬 𝐛𝐲 𝐰𝐡𝐢𝐜𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧, 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐛𝐲 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐥𝐮𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐜𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠, 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐜𝐞𝐩𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬, 𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐡.

𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐬𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜 𝐛𝐚𝐬𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐡𝐨𝐰 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐡𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐚𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐬 𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐥 𝐜𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐲, 𝐜𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐛𝐚𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞. 𝐈𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐢𝐞𝐰, 𝐈 𝐬𝐡𝐚𝐥𝐥 𝐭𝐫𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐬𝐮𝐦𝐦𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐳𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐠𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐟𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐞𝐚.

𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬

𝐈𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐥𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐜𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐜𝐭𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞, 𝐛𝐥𝐨𝐨𝐝 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐮𝐫𝐞, 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐝𝐢𝐠𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧. 𝐒𝐨, 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐰𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐬𝐞𝐝, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐲𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐜 𝐝𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐮𝐭𝐨𝐧𝐨𝐦𝐢𝐜 𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐬𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐦 𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐠𝐢𝐳𝐞𝐬 𝐮𝐬 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐟𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐨𝐫 𝐟𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐪𝐮𝐢𝐞𝐭 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞𝐬, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐚𝐬𝐲𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐜 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐨𝐧𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐜𝐨𝐨𝐥𝐬 𝐮𝐬 𝐝𝐨𝐰𝐧.

𝐈𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐯𝐢𝐞𝐰, 𝐢𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐮𝐦𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐮𝐭𝐨𝐧𝐨𝐦𝐢𝐜 𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐬𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐦 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐡𝐲𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐩𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐦𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐫𝐭 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧’𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐩𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐚 𝐠𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐮𝐥𝐮𝐬 (𝐑𝐞𝐢𝐧, 𝐀𝐭𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐨𝐧, 𝐞𝐭 𝐚𝐥, 𝟏𝟗𝟗𝟓).

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧

𝐇𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫, 𝐟𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐬𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐲𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐜𝐡, 𝐢𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐨𝐛𝐬𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐢𝐧 𝐰𝐚𝐲𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐬𝐢𝐠𝐧𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐧𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐡𝐨𝐰 𝐰𝐞 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐜𝐞𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐜𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐥𝐝. 𝐈𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐬𝐞𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐢𝐚𝐫 𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐢𝐜 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐟𝐫𝐞𝐪𝐮𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐝𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐠𝐞𝐝 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐝𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐮𝐭𝐨𝐧𝐨𝐦𝐢𝐜 𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐬𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐦.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐦𝐞𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐟𝐮𝐥 𝐦𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐚𝐠𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐭 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐭𝐨𝐨𝐝, 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐨𝐛𝐞𝐲𝐞𝐝 (𝐋𝐚𝐜𝐞𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐋𝐚𝐜𝐞𝐲, 𝟏𝟗𝟕𝟖). 𝐋𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐫, 𝐧𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐲𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐜𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐚 𝐧𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐡𝐰𝐚𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐦𝐞𝐜𝐡𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐬𝐦 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐛𝐲 𝐢𝐧𝐩𝐮𝐭 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐜𝐨𝐮𝐥𝐝 𝐢𝐧𝐡𝐢𝐛𝐢𝐭 𝐨𝐫 𝐟𝐚𝐜𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧’𝐬 𝐞𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐭𝐲 (𝐌𝐜𝐂𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐲, 𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟐)

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭:

𝐀𝐟𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐞𝐱𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐜𝐡, 𝐀𝐫𝐦𝐨𝐮𝐫 (𝟏𝟗𝟗𝟒) 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐝𝐮𝐜𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐩𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐟𝐮𝐧𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 ‘𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧’. 𝐇𝐢𝐬 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐤 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐚 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐱 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐜 𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐬𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐬𝐮𝐟𝐟𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐬𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐪𝐮𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐟𝐲 𝐚𝐬 𝐚 ‘𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐭𝐥𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧’ 𝐢𝐧 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐫𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭’𝐬 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐧 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐧𝐞𝐭𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐤 𝐨𝐟 𝐬𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐭𝐲𝐩𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐧𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐬, 𝐧𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐦𝐢𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐬, 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐞𝐢𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐮𝐩𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭 𝐜𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐬 𝐬𝐢𝐦𝐢𝐥𝐚𝐫 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐞𝐫.

𝐈𝐭𝐬 𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐜𝐢𝐫𝐜𝐮𝐢𝐭𝐫𝐲 𝐞𝐧𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐚𝐜𝐭 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐩𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 – 𝐭𝐨 𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐧, 𝐫𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐦𝐛𝐞𝐫, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐟𝐞𝐞𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐬𝐞. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭’𝐬 𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐬𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐦 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝 𝟒𝟎,𝟎𝟎𝟎 𝐧𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐬, 𝐜𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐬𝐨𝐫𝐲 𝐧𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐞𝐬 (𝐀𝐫𝐦𝐨𝐮𝐫, 𝟏𝟗𝟗𝟏).

𝐈𝐧𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 – 𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐥𝐮𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐟𝐞𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐬𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 – 𝐢𝐬 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡 𝐬𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐬. 𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐚𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐞 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐡𝐰𝐚𝐲𝐬 𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐞𝐚 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐞𝐝𝐮𝐥𝐥𝐚, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐜𝐚𝐬𝐜𝐚𝐝𝐞 𝐮𝐩 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐜𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧, 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐲 𝐦𝐚𝐲 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐥𝐮𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐜𝐞𝐩𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐝𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐜𝐨𝐠𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐜𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐬 (𝐀𝐫𝐦𝐨𝐮𝐫, 𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟒). 𝐓𝐡𝐮𝐬, 𝐢𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐜 𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐬𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐨𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐜𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐩𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐨𝐫 𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐬𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐦.

𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐬 𝐰𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰𝐬 𝐚 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐤. 𝐍𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐯𝐢𝐚 𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐞 𝐟𝐢𝐛𝐫𝐞𝐬 𝐫𝐮𝐧𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐯𝐚𝐠𝐮𝐬 𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐜𝐨𝐥𝐮𝐦𝐧. 𝐈𝐧 𝐚 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐭, 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐧𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐝𝐨 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐧𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐚𝐧 𝐞𝐱𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐝 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐨𝐝 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞; 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐞𝐚𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐟𝐮𝐧𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐢𝐧 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐧𝐞𝐰 𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐭 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐚𝐩𝐚𝐜𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐜𝐭, 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐜 𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐬𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐦 (𝐌𝐮𝐫𝐩𝐡𝐲, 𝐞𝐭 𝐚𝐥, 𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟎)

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭’𝐬 𝐦𝐚𝐠𝐧𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐜 𝐟𝐢𝐞𝐥𝐝:

𝐑𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐜𝐡 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐨𝐝𝐲 𝐯𝐢𝐚 𝐞𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐦𝐚𝐠𝐧𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐜 𝐟𝐢𝐞𝐥𝐝 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐠𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐨𝐝𝐲’𝐬 𝐦𝐨𝐬𝐭 𝐩𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐟𝐮𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐦𝐨𝐬𝐭 𝐞𝐱𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐫𝐡𝐲𝐭𝐡𝐦𝐢𝐜 𝐞𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐦𝐚𝐠𝐧𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐜 𝐟𝐢𝐞𝐥𝐝. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭’𝐬 𝐦𝐚𝐠𝐧𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐜 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐨𝐧𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝟓𝟎𝟎 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞𝐬 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧’𝐬 𝐦𝐚𝐠𝐧𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐜 𝐟𝐢𝐞𝐥𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐛𝐞 𝐝𝐞𝐭𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐬𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐟𝐞𝐞𝐭 𝐚𝐰𝐚𝐲 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐨𝐝𝐲. 𝐈𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭, 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐟𝐢𝐞𝐥𝐝 𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐬 𝐚𝐬 𝐚 𝐜𝐚𝐫𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐫 𝐰𝐚𝐯𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐬 𝐚 𝐠𝐥𝐨𝐛𝐚𝐥 𝐬𝐲𝐧𝐜𝐡𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐢𝐳𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐬𝐢𝐠𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐫𝐞 𝐛𝐨𝐝𝐲 (𝐌𝐜𝐂𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐲, 𝐁𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐥𝐞𝐲 & 𝐓𝐨𝐦𝐚𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐨, 𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟒)

𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐟𝐢𝐞𝐥𝐝 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐭𝐰𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐮𝐚𝐥𝐬

𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐰 𝐞𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐚 𝐬𝐮𝐛𝐭𝐥𝐞 𝐲𝐞𝐭 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐥𝐮𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐞𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐦𝐚𝐠𝐧𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐜 𝐨𝐫 ‘𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐠𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐜’ 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐬𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐦 𝐨𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐬 𝐣𝐮𝐬𝐭 𝐛𝐞𝐥𝐨𝐰 𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐚𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐬. 𝐄𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐠𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐜 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐛𝐥𝐲 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐛𝐮𝐭𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 ‘𝐦𝐚𝐠𝐧𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐜’ 𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐫 𝐫𝐞𝐩𝐮𝐥𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐨𝐜𝐜𝐮𝐫 𝐛𝐞𝐭𝐰𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐮𝐚𝐥𝐬, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐚𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐬𝐨𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐡𝐢𝐩𝐬. 𝐈𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐨𝐧’𝐬 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐰𝐚𝐯𝐞𝐬 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐬𝐲𝐧𝐜𝐡𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐢𝐳𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐚𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐨𝐧’𝐬 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 (𝐌𝐜𝐂𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐲, 𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟒).

𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐯𝐢𝐚 𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐞𝐬: 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐚𝐬 𝐚 𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐠𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐝

𝐀𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐨𝐧𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭-𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐬𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐦 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐜𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐬𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐲𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐬𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐦. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐥𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐧 𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐨𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐞 𝐠𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐧, 𝐢𝐧 𝟏𝟗𝟖𝟑, 𝐚 𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐝𝐮𝐜𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐜𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐮𝐫𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐜 𝐟𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐨𝐫 (𝐀𝐍𝐅) 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐢𝐬𝐨𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝. 𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐞𝐱𝐞𝐫𝐭𝐬 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐞𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐥𝐨𝐨𝐝 𝐯𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐬, 𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐤𝐢𝐝𝐧𝐞𝐲𝐬, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐝𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐠𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐝𝐬, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐨𝐧 𝐚 𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐠𝐞 𝐧𝐮𝐦𝐛𝐞𝐫 𝐨𝐟 𝐫𝐞𝐠𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐲 𝐫𝐞𝐠𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧.

𝐈𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐬 𝐚 𝐜𝐞𝐥𝐥 𝐭𝐲𝐩𝐞 𝐤𝐧𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐚𝐬 ‘𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐜 𝐜𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐚𝐜 𝐚𝐝𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐠𝐢𝐜’’ (𝐈𝐂𝐀) 𝐜𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐬. 𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐜𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐝𝐨𝐩𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐞 𝐧𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐦𝐢𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐬, 𝐨𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐝𝐮𝐜𝐞𝐝 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐛𝐲 𝐧𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐂𝐍𝐒. 𝐌𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐥𝐲, 𝐢𝐭 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐜𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐬𝐞𝐜𝐫𝐞𝐭𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐱𝐲𝐭𝐨𝐜𝐢𝐧, 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐫𝐞𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 ‘𝐥𝐨𝐯𝐞’ 𝐨𝐫 𝐛𝐨𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐞.

𝐈𝐧 𝐚𝐝𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐨 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐟𝐮𝐧𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐥𝐝𝐛𝐢𝐫𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐥𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐞𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐢𝐧𝐯𝐨𝐥𝐯𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐜𝐨𝐠𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐭𝐨𝐥𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞, 𝐚𝐝𝐚𝐩𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐱 𝐬𝐞𝐱𝐮𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐛𝐞𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐬, 𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐧𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐬𝐨𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐜𝐮𝐞𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐢𝐬𝐡𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐩𝐚𝐢𝐫 𝐛𝐨𝐧𝐝𝐬. 𝐂𝐨𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐨𝐱𝐲𝐭𝐨𝐜𝐢𝐧 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐰𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐚𝐬 𝐡𝐢𝐠𝐡 𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐬𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 (𝐂𝐚𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐧 & 𝐆𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐭, 𝟏𝟗𝟖𝟔).

𝐈𝐧𝐜𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐩𝐬𝐲𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐲𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐜𝐨𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞

𝐃𝐚𝐭𝐚 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐰𝐡𝐞𝐧 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐫𝐡𝐲𝐭𝐡𝐦 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐭, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐧𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐟𝐚𝐜𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐟𝐮𝐧𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧. 𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐞𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐟𝐭𝐞𝐧 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐬 𝐡𝐞𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐥 𝐜𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐲, 𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐝 𝐝𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐜𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐭𝐲. 𝐀𝐝𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲, 𝐜𝐨𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐢𝐧𝐩𝐮𝐭 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐟𝐚𝐜𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐟𝐞𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐬.

𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐦𝐚𝐲 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐰𝐡𝐲 𝐦𝐨𝐬𝐭 𝐩𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐨𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐥𝐨𝐯𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐟𝐞𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐰𝐡𝐲 𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐲 𝐩𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐮𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐟𝐞𝐞𝐥 𝐨𝐫 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐬𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐫𝐞𝐚 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭. 𝐒𝐨, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐬𝐞𝐞𝐦𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐛𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐥𝐲 𝐢𝐧𝐯𝐨𝐥𝐯𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐠𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐩𝐬𝐲𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐲𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐜𝐨𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 (𝐓𝐢𝐥𝐥𝐞 𝐞𝐭 𝐚𝐥, 𝟏𝟗𝟗𝟔, & 𝐌𝐜𝐂𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐲, 𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟎).

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐦𝐲𝐠𝐝𝐚𝐥𝐚

𝐑𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐜𝐡 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭’𝐬 𝐚𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐧𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐬𝐢𝐠𝐧𝐚𝐥𝐬 𝐝𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐚𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐜𝐭 𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐦𝐲𝐠𝐝𝐚𝐥𝐚 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐨𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐧𝐮𝐜𝐥𝐞𝐢, 𝐚𝐧 𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐭 𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐜𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐜𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐦𝐲𝐠𝐝𝐚𝐥𝐚 𝐢𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐤𝐞𝐲 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐜𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐜𝐨𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐡𝐚𝐯𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐥, 𝐢𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐧𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐨𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐨𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐩𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐞𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐞𝐧𝐯𝐢𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐥 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭𝐬.

𝐈𝐭 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐬𝐢𝐠𝐧𝐚𝐥𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐬𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐦𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐬, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐜𝐜𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐥𝐲 𝐦𝐚𝐤𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐞𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐝𝐞𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐜𝐞𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭. 𝐃𝐮𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐞𝐱𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐧𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐢𝐦𝐛𝐢𝐜 𝐬𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐦, 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐧𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐥 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐡𝐰𝐚𝐲𝐬, 𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐮𝐭𝐨𝐧𝐨𝐦𝐢𝐜 𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐬𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐦 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐩𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐜𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐞𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐬𝐨𝐫𝐲 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 (𝐑𝐞𝐢𝐧, 𝐌𝐜𝐂𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐀𝐭𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐨𝐧, 𝟏𝟗𝟗𝟓 & 𝐌𝐜𝐂𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐲 𝐞𝐭 𝐚𝐥, 𝟏𝟗𝟗𝟓).

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐮𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧

𝐀 𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐲 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐜𝐡 𝐟𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐯𝐨𝐥𝐯𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐜𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐝𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐨𝐟 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐮𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 (𝐌𝐜𝐂𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐲, 𝐀𝐭𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐨𝐧 & 𝐁𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐥𝐞𝐲, 𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟒). 𝐏𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐝𝐚𝐭𝐚 𝐬𝐮𝐠𝐠𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭’𝐬 𝐟𝐢𝐞𝐥𝐝 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐝𝐢𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐥𝐲 𝐢𝐧𝐯𝐨𝐥𝐯𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐮𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐜𝐞𝐩𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐜𝐨𝐮𝐩𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐨 𝐚𝐧 𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐠𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐜 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐟𝐢𝐞𝐥𝐝 𝐨𝐮𝐭𝐬𝐢𝐝𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐬𝐩𝐚𝐜𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞 (𝐂𝐡𝐢𝐥𝐝𝐫𝐞 & 𝐌𝐜𝐂𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐲, 𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟏).

𝐔𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚 𝐫𝐢𝐠𝐨𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐥 𝐝𝐞𝐬𝐢𝐠𝐧; 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐞𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐛𝐨𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐩𝐨𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐚 𝐟𝐮𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐞 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐛𝐞𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐮𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲 𝐡𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐞𝐧𝐬. 𝐄𝐯𝐞𝐧 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐬𝐮𝐫𝐩𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐰𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐮𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐛𝐞𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 (𝐌𝐜𝐂𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐲, 𝐀𝐭𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐨𝐧 & 𝐁𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐥𝐞𝐲, 𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟒).

𝐃𝐢𝐬𝐜𝐮𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧

𝐈𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐥𝐨𝐧𝐠 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐚𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐠𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐚𝐥𝐨𝐧𝐞. 𝐑𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜 𝐬𝐭𝐮𝐝𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐬𝐮𝐠𝐠𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐫𝐠𝐞𝐬 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐛𝐨𝐝𝐲 𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐨𝐠𝐞𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 (𝐏𝐨𝐩𝐩𝐞𝐫 & 𝐄𝐜𝐜𝐥𝐞𝐬, 𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟎). 𝐀𝐬 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐬𝐡𝐨𝐰𝐧, 𝐚 𝐠𝐫𝐨𝐰𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐛𝐨𝐝𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐞𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐰 𝐬𝐮𝐠𝐠𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐲𝐬 𝐚 𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐬𝐢𝐠𝐧𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐧𝐭 𝐫𝐨𝐥𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐜𝐞𝐬𝐬.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐯𝐞 𝐟𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐟𝐚𝐫 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐧 𝐚 𝐬𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞 𝐩𝐮𝐦𝐩. 𝐈𝐧 𝐟𝐚𝐜𝐭, 𝐢𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐬𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐧𝐨𝐰 𝐚𝐬 𝐚 𝐡𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐥𝐲 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐱, 𝐬𝐞𝐥𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐠𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐳𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐩𝐫𝐨𝐜𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐜𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐞 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐢𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐟𝐮𝐧𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 ‘𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧’ 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐥𝐮𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐬, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐯𝐢𝐚 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐬𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐦, 𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐬𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐦 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐡𝐰𝐚𝐲𝐬.

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐯𝐨𝐥𝐯𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐮𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐟𝐮𝐧𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐢𝐬 𝐚𝐧𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐩𝐢𝐞𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧. 𝐇𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐫, 𝐚𝐬 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐬 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐟𝐮𝐧𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐧𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐥𝐥𝐲, 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐛𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐝 𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐬 𝐚 𝐦𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐮𝐦 𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐨𝐨𝐥, 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐚𝐧 𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐥𝐲𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐬𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐠𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐬𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐚𝐩𝐚𝐜𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐜𝐚𝐫𝐫𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐮𝐚𝐥.

𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐧𝐞𝐰 𝐯𝐢𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐦𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐠𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐛𝐞𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐩𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐬 𝐚 𝐦𝐮𝐥𝐭𝐢-𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐨𝐧𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐨𝐭 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐡𝐲𝐬𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐞𝐧𝐯𝐢𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡 𝐝𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐦𝐞𝐚𝐧𝐬, 𝐛𝐮𝐭 𝐚𝐥𝐬𝐨 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐚𝐩𝐚𝐜𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐬𝐦𝐢𝐜 𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡 𝐧𝐨𝐧-𝐩𝐡𝐲𝐬𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐡𝐰𝐚𝐲𝐬 (𝐋𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐦𝐞𝐫, 𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟏).

𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐠𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐬 𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐩𝐭 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐢𝐭 𝐚𝐬 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐧𝐨𝐧-𝐩𝐡𝐲𝐬𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐞𝐥𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭, 𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐢𝐞𝐥𝐝, 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐬𝐦𝐨𝐬 𝐨𝐮𝐭𝐬𝐢𝐝𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐬𝐩𝐚𝐜𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐞𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐬𝐮𝐜𝐡 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐞𝐬 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐩𝐡𝐞𝐧𝐨𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐚 𝐨𝐟 𝐞𝐱𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐬𝐞𝐧𝐬𝐨𝐫𝐲 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐜𝐞𝐩𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 (𝐭𝐞𝐥𝐞𝐩𝐚𝐭𝐡𝐲, 𝐩𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐠𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐜𝐥𝐚𝐢𝐫𝐯𝐨𝐲𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞), 𝐩𝐬𝐲𝐜𝐡𝐨-𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐢𝐬, 𝐩𝐬𝐲𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐜 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐢𝐠𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐞𝐱𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐬 (𝐑𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐧, 𝟏𝟗𝟗𝟕 & 𝐇𝐞𝐧𝐫𝐲, 𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟓).

𝐏𝐨𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐛𝐥𝐲 𝐟𝐮𝐫𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐚𝐝𝐯𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐢𝐧 𝐪𝐮𝐚𝐧𝐭𝐮𝐦 𝐩𝐡𝐲𝐬𝐢𝐜𝐬 𝐦𝐚𝐲 𝐨𝐧𝐞 𝐝𝐚𝐲 𝐠𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐮𝐬 𝐟𝐮𝐫𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫 𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐭 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐨 𝐡𝐨𝐰 𝐰𝐞 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐧𝐞𝐰 𝐦𝐨𝐝𝐞𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭, 𝐦𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐬𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐢𝐭.

𝐌𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐑𝐞𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐬

𝐀𝐫𝐦𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐉 𝐀 (𝟏𝟗𝟗𝟏), 𝐀𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐨𝐦𝐲 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐟𝐮𝐧𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐢𝐜 𝐧𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐠𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐦𝐚𝐦𝐦𝐚𝐥𝐢𝐚𝐧 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭. 𝐈𝐧: 𝐙𝐮𝐜𝐤𝐞𝐫 𝐈 𝐇 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐆𝐢𝐥𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐉 𝐏, 𝐞𝐝𝐬. 𝐑𝐞𝐟𝐥𝐞𝐱 𝐂𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐂𝐢𝐫𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧. 𝐁𝐨𝐜𝐚 𝐑𝐚𝐭𝐨𝐧, 𝐅𝐋, 𝐂𝐑𝐂 𝐏𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐬: 𝟏-𝟑𝟕.

𝐀𝐫𝐦𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐉 𝐀 (𝟏𝟗𝟗𝟒), 𝐍𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐨𝐜𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐲: 𝐀𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐨𝐦𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐅𝐮𝐧𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐏𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐢𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐬, 𝐍𝐞𝐰 𝐘𝐨𝐫𝐤, 𝐍𝐘, 𝐎𝐱𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐝 𝐔𝐧𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐏𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐬: 𝟑-𝟏𝟗.

𝐀𝐫𝐦𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐉. 𝐀. (𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟒), 𝐂𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐚𝐜 𝐧𝐞𝐮𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐡𝐢𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐫𝐜𝐡𝐲 𝐢𝐧 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐝𝐢𝐬𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐞, 𝐀𝐦𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐣𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐩𝐡𝐲𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐲, 𝐫𝐞𝐠𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐨𝐫𝐲, 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐠𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐩𝐡𝐲𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐲. 𝐀𝐮𝐠; 𝟐𝟖𝟕(𝟐):𝐑𝟐𝟔𝟐-𝟕𝟏.

𝐂𝐚𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐧 𝐌. 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐆𝐞𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐉. (𝟏𝟗𝟖𝟔), 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐚𝐬 𝐚𝐧 𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐨𝐜𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐞 𝐠𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐝, 𝐂𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐈𝐧𝐯𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐠𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐌𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐧𝐞; 𝟗(𝟒): 𝟑𝟏𝟗-𝟑𝟐𝟕.

𝐂𝐡𝐢𝐥𝐝𝐫𝐞 𝐃, 𝐌𝐜𝐂𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐲 𝐑 (𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟏), 𝐏𝐬𝐲𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐲𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐂𝐨𝐫𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐒𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐮𝐚𝐥 𝐄𝐱𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞, 𝐁𝐢𝐨𝐟𝐞𝐞𝐝𝐛𝐚𝐜𝐤; 𝟐𝟗(𝟒):𝟏𝟑-𝟏𝟕.

𝐇𝐞𝐧𝐫𝐲 𝐉 (𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟓), 𝐏𝐚𝐫𝐚𝐩𝐬𝐲𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐲, 𝐑𝐨𝐮𝐭𝐥𝐞𝐝𝐠𝐞, 𝐓𝐚𝐲𝐥𝐨𝐫 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐅𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐢𝐬 𝐆𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐩: 𝟗𝟏- 𝟏𝟒𝟖

𝐋𝐚𝐜𝐞𝐲 𝐉 𝐈 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐋𝐚𝐜𝐞𝐲 𝐁 𝐂 (𝟏𝟗𝟕𝟖), 𝐓𝐰𝐨-𝐰𝐚𝐲 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐛𝐞𝐭𝐰𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐛𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧: 𝐒𝐢𝐠𝐧𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐚𝐜 𝐜𝐲𝐜𝐥𝐞. 𝐀𝐦𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐏𝐬𝐲𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐢𝐬𝐭, 𝐅𝐞𝐛𝐫𝐮𝐚𝐫𝐲: 𝟗𝟗-𝟏𝟏𝟑.

𝐋𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐦𝐞𝐫 𝐃 (𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟏), 𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐁𝐞𝐲𝐨𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐁𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧: 𝐀 𝐖𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐫 𝐒𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐂𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐬; 𝟑𝟒-𝟖𝟎. 𝐅𝐥𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐬 𝐁𝐨𝐨𝐤𝐬, 𝐄𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐛𝐮𝐫𝐠𝐡, 𝐔𝐊.

𝐌𝐜𝐂𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐲 𝐑 (𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟎), 𝐏𝐬𝐲𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐲𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐜𝐨𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞: 𝐀 𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐤 𝐛𝐞𝐭𝐰𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐩𝐨𝐬𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐞𝐦𝐨𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬, 𝐬𝐭𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐝𝐮𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐩𝐞𝐫𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐡. 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐜𝐞𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐄𝐥𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐡 𝐈𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐂𝐨𝐧𝐠𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐬 𝐨𝐧 𝐒𝐭𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐬, 𝐌𝐚𝐮𝐧𝐚 𝐋𝐚𝐧𝐢 𝐁𝐚𝐲, 𝐇𝐚𝐰𝐚𝐢𝐢.

𝐌𝐜𝐂𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐲 𝐑 (𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟐), 𝐈𝐧𝐟𝐥𝐮𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐂𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐚𝐜 𝐀𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐈𝐧𝐩𝐮𝐭 𝐨𝐧 𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭-𝐁𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐒𝐲𝐧𝐜𝐡𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐢𝐳𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐂𝐨𝐠𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐏𝐞𝐫𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞. 𝐈𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐉𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐏𝐬𝐲𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐲𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐲; 𝟒𝟓(𝟏-𝟐):𝟕𝟐-𝟕𝟑.

𝐌𝐜𝐂𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐲 𝐑 (𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟒), 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐄𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐠𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐜 𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭: 𝐁𝐢𝐨𝐞𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐦𝐚𝐠𝐧𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐜 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐖𝐢𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐁𝐞𝐭𝐰𝐞𝐞𝐧 𝐏𝐞𝐨𝐩𝐥𝐞, 𝐂𝐡𝐚𝐩𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐩𝐮𝐛𝐥𝐢𝐬𝐡𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧: 𝐂𝐥𝐢𝐧𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐀𝐩𝐩𝐥𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐁𝐢𝐨𝐞𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐦𝐚𝐠𝐧𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐜 𝐌𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐧𝐞, 𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐛𝐲 𝐑𝐨𝐬𝐜𝐡 𝐏 𝐉 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐌𝐚𝐫𝐤𝐨𝐯 𝐌 𝐒. 𝐍𝐞𝐰 𝐘𝐨𝐫𝐤: 𝐌𝐚𝐫𝐜𝐞𝐥 𝐃𝐞𝐤𝐤𝐞𝐫: 𝟓𝟒𝟏-𝟓𝟔𝟐

𝐌𝐜𝐂𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐲 𝐑, 𝐀𝐭𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐨𝐧 𝐌, 𝐁𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐥𝐞𝐲 𝐑𝐓 (𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟒, 𝐚), 𝐄𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐲𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐄𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐈𝐧𝐭𝐮𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧: 𝐏𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝟏. 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐒𝐮𝐫𝐩𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐑𝐨𝐥𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭, 𝐉𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐥𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐫𝐲 𝐌𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐧𝐞; 𝟏𝟎(𝟏):𝟏𝟑𝟑-𝟏𝟒𝟑.

𝐌𝐜𝐂𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐲 𝐑, 𝐀𝐭𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐨𝐧 𝐌, 𝐁𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐥𝐞𝐲 𝐑𝐓 (𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟒, 𝐛), 𝐄𝐥𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐩𝐡𝐲𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐄𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐈𝐧𝐭𝐮𝐢𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧: 𝐏𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝟐; 𝐀 𝐒𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐦-𝐖𝐢𝐝𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐜𝐞𝐬𝐬? 𝐉𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐥𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐫𝐲 𝐌𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐧𝐞 (𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟒); 𝟏𝟎(𝟐):𝟑𝟐𝟓-𝟑𝟑𝟔.

𝐌𝐜𝐂𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐲 𝐑, 𝐀𝐭𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐨𝐧 𝐌 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐓𝐢𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐫 𝐖 𝐀 𝐞𝐭 𝐚𝐥 (𝟏𝟗𝟗𝟓), 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐄𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐄𝐦𝐨𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐧 𝐒𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐭-𝐓𝐞𝐫𝐦 𝐏𝐨𝐰𝐞𝐫 𝐒𝐩𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐫𝐮𝐦 𝐀𝐧𝐚𝐥𝐲𝐬𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐑𝐚𝐭𝐞 𝐕𝐚𝐫𝐢𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐥𝐢𝐭𝐲. 𝐀𝐦𝐞𝐫𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐉𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐂𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐲; 𝟕𝟔(𝟏𝟒):𝟏𝟎𝟖𝟗—𝟏𝟎𝟗𝟑.

𝐌𝐜𝐂𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐲 𝐑, 𝐁𝐫𝐚𝐝𝐥𝐞𝐲 𝐑𝐓, 𝐓𝐨𝐦𝐚𝐬𝐢𝐧𝐨 𝐃 (𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟒), 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐑𝐞𝐬𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐧𝐭 𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭, 𝐒𝐡𝐢𝐟𝐭: 𝐀𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐅𝐫𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐞𝐫𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐂𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬𝐧𝐞𝐬𝐬; 𝟓:𝟏𝟓-𝟏𝟗.

𝐌𝐮𝐫𝐩𝐡𝐲 𝐃 𝐀, 𝐓𝐡𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐬𝐨𝐧 𝐆 𝐖, 𝐞𝐭 𝐚𝐥 (𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟎), 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭 𝐫𝐞𝐢𝐧𝐧𝐞𝐫𝐯𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐬 𝐚𝐟𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐬𝐩𝐥𝐚𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧. 𝐀𝐧𝐧𝐚𝐥𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐓𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐢𝐜 𝐒𝐮𝐫𝐠𝐞𝐫𝐲; 𝟔𝟗(𝟔): 𝟏𝟕𝟔𝟗-𝟏𝟕𝟖𝟏.

𝐏𝐨𝐩𝐩𝐞𝐫 𝐊 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐄𝐜𝐜𝐥𝐞𝐬 𝐉 𝐂 (𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟎), 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐒𝐞𝐥𝐟-𝐂𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐌𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐁𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧. 𝐈𝐧: 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐒𝐞𝐥𝐟 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐈𝐭𝐬 𝐁𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧. 𝐑𝐨𝐮𝐭𝐥𝐞𝐝𝐠𝐞, 𝐓𝐚𝐲𝐥𝐨𝐫 & 𝐅𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐢𝐬 𝐆𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐩, 𝐋𝐨𝐧𝐝𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐍𝐞𝐰 𝐘𝐨𝐫𝐤: 𝟑𝟓𝟓-𝟑𝟕𝟔

𝐑𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐧 𝐃 𝐈 (𝟏𝟗𝟗𝟕), 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐂𝐨𝐧𝐬𝐜𝐢𝐨𝐮𝐬 𝐔𝐧𝐢𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞: 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐒𝐜𝐢𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜 𝐓𝐫𝐮𝐭𝐡 𝐨𝐟 𝐏𝐬𝐲𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐜 𝐏𝐡𝐞𝐧𝐨𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐚, 𝐇𝐚𝐫𝐩𝐞𝐫 𝐄𝐝𝐠𝐞, 𝐒𝐚𝐧 𝐅𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐢𝐬𝐜𝐨, 𝟏𝟗𝟗𝟕: 𝟔𝟏-𝟏𝟕𝟒

𝐑𝐞𝐢𝐧 𝐆, 𝐀𝐭𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐨𝐧 𝐌, 𝐞𝐭 𝐚𝐥 (𝟏𝟗𝟗𝟓), 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐡𝐲𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐩𝐬𝐲𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐞𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐫. 𝐉𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐝𝐯𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐢𝐧 𝐌𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐧𝐞; 𝟖(𝟐): 𝟖𝟕-𝟏𝟎𝟓.

𝐑𝐞𝐢𝐧 𝐆, 𝐌𝐜𝐂𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐲 𝐑 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐀𝐭𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐬𝐨𝐧 𝐌 (𝟏𝟗𝟗𝟓), 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐏𝐡𝐲𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐏𝐬𝐲𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐥𝐨𝐠𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐄𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐚𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐀𝐧𝐠𝐞𝐫, 𝐉𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐀𝐝𝐯𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐢𝐧 𝐌𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐧𝐞; 𝟖(𝟐):𝟖𝟕—𝟏𝟎𝟓.

𝐒𝐚𝐥𝐞𝐦, 𝐌𝐎 (𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟒) 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐍𝐞𝐜𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐢𝐭𝐲 𝐭𝐨 𝐑𝐞𝐯𝐢𝐞𝐰 𝐏𝐬𝐲𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐜 𝐂𝐮𝐫𝐫𝐢𝐜𝐮𝐥𝐚, 𝐞-𝐂𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐮𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐲; 𝐈𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐉𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐨𝐟 𝐌𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐥 𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐡 & 𝐀𝐝𝐝𝐢𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝐌𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐥 𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐡 𝐂𝐚𝐫𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐆𝐮𝐥𝐟 𝐂𝐨𝐧𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐜𝐞𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐬

𝐓𝐢𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐫 𝐖, 𝐌𝐜𝐂𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐲 𝐑, 𝐞𝐭 𝐚𝐥 (𝟏𝟗𝟗𝟔), 𝐂𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐚𝐜 𝐜𝐨𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞; 𝐀 𝐧𝐞𝐰 𝐧𝐨𝐧-𝐢𝐧𝐯𝐚𝐬𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐦𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐮𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐚𝐮𝐭𝐨𝐧𝐨𝐦𝐢𝐜 𝐬𝐲𝐬𝐭𝐞𝐦 𝐨𝐫𝐝𝐞𝐫. 𝐀𝐥𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐓𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐩𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐥𝐭𝐡 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐌𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐧𝐞; 𝟐(𝟏): 𝟓𝟐-𝟔𝟓

© 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐟𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐨𝐫 𝐌𝐨𝐡𝐚𝐦𝐞𝐝 𝐎𝐦𝐚𝐫 𝐒𝐚𝐥𝐞𝐦 𝟐𝟎𝟎𝟕

𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐡 𝐊𝐧𝐨𝐰𝐬 𝐁𝐞𝐬𝐭.

𝐑𝐞𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐜𝐞𝐬:

Professor Mohamed Omar Salem

Miracles of Quran

When the Heart Leads to Wise Reasoning

Wise reasoning is not exclusively a function of the brain. Your Heart’s Got Something To Do With It Too.

Wisdom is a matter of both heart and mind, research finds

Where is the location of one’s reasoning? Is it in the heart or in the brain?

Follow the heart or the head? The interactive influence model of emotion and cognition

Clinical potential of sensory neurites in the heart and their role in decision-making

How a racing heart may alter decision-making brain circuits

A new 3-D map illuminates the ‘little brain’ within the heart

Exploring the Role of the Heart in Human Performance

The Significance of the Heart-Brain Connection

Is the heart connected to the brain?

You DO Think with Your Heart

The Mind-Heart-Body-Connection – American Heart Association

Emotional Rescue: The Heart-Brain Connection

The Heart’s “Little Brain”

Heart Intelligence

Brain Cells

Qalb

RōḼ

Nafs

القلب في القرآن

آيات وعد فيها “قلب”

𝐒𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐜𝐞:

𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐇𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐭, 𝐌𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐒𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐢𝐭 𝐌𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐜𝐚𝐥 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐏𝐬𝐲𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐜 𝐑𝐞𝐬𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐜𝐡 𝐏𝐚𝐩𝐞𝐫 𝐁𝐲: 𝐏𝐫𝐨𝐟𝐞𝐬𝐬𝐨𝐫 𝐌𝐨𝐡𝐚𝐦𝐞𝐝 𝐎𝐦𝐚𝐫 𝐒𝐚𝐥𝐞𝐦- 𝐑𝐨𝐲𝐚𝐥 𝐂𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐠𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐏𝐬𝐲𝐜𝐡𝐢𝐚𝐭𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬, 𝐔𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐊𝐢𝐧𝐠𝐝𝐨𝐦 𝐨𝐟 𝐆𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭 𝐁𝐫𝐢𝐭𝐚𝐢𝐧.

𝐂𝐫𝐞𝐝𝐢𝐭: 𝐔𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐭𝐚𝐧𝐝𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐐𝐮𝐫𝐚𝐧